Archives for May 2019

13 Best Day Trips From Paris, France

The elegant boulevards, iconic architecture, beautiful parks, and delicious food make Paris such a magical city that it’s easy to say you won’t get enough of it even if you have a day or two to spare. Maybe you’d rather spend long hours strolling in the Luxembourg Gardens, wandering around Louvre or hanging out at Shakespeare and Company; but France and its neighboring countries have so much to offer that there are several day trips from Paris that you can do as well.

Fairytale castles surrounded by water, dramatic Gothic churches, stunning seaside villages, important historical sites, gardens and vineyards, and even chocolates to entice you to get out and explore.

Here’s a list of best day trips from Paris, France.

13 Best Day Trips From Paris, France

1.Versailles

Versailles Chateau Jardins

Versailles sounds like a given when you’re in Paris, but there are countless reasons why people flock here. Stay for a day, and you’ll never run out of things to do. Situated on the western side of Paris, Versailles is a significant place for several historical events. The château was formerly a hunting lodge built by Louis XII and nowadays it holds the Museum of France’s history.

Less than an hour from the capital, make sure you include Versailles when planning your Paris day trips. Here you can walk around the grounds, rent a bike, or even better, a golf cart. Explore the huge palace and gardens and experience some of the most opulent interiors and intricate gardens in the world. Make sure you visit the Hall of Mirrors, the stunning opera house and the new court of scents where you can learn all about perfumes and their history.

Versailles also has a great food market with a variety of options like wine, fish, fruits, cheeses and so much more to spend some time at, and where you can get lunch dinner or snacks when you get hungry from exploring.

Opening Hours

Castle
from 9h to 18h30
closed on Monday

Domaine de Trianon
from 12h to 18h30
closed on Mondays

Gardens
from 8h to 20h30

Galerie des Carrosses
from 12:30 to 18:30
closed on Mondays

Admission Fee

Passport ticket – € 27 -This ticket gives access to the whole area of ​​Versailles and Trianon.
Castle ticket – € 16 

Free with conditions:
under 18s (under 26 if residents of the European Union),
teachers assigned to a French institution with their Education Pass,
people with disabilities and their companion,
jobseekers in France and beneficiaries of social minima on presentation of proof of less than 6 months.

Guided Tour-€ 10 

Contact Information

Address: Place d’Armes  78000 Versailles France

Phone:01 30 83 78 00 

To book, click here. 

2.Giverny

Claude Monet's Garden in Giverny, France

Located just 80 kilometers to the west of France, the village of Giverny was the home of the Impressionist painter Claude Monet from 1883 until his death in 1926. The village and its surroundings inspired many of Monet’s paintings so if you love art, a visit to Giverny is a Paris day trip that you must experience.

In this tiny village is Monet’s home, now known as the Claude Monet Museum, where much of his belongings and how the rooms were arranged were pretty much untouched. This is also where you can see the elaborate gardens, the iconic Japanese Garden, which has the famous water lily ponds and Japanese Bridge. Giverny is also home to the Musée des Impressionnismes where you can discover more about the Impressionist painters.

Opening Hours

Museum of Impressionism

Museum, boutique, and restaurant open from March 22nd to July 14th and from July 27th to November 11th, 2019
every day, including public holidays, from 10 am to 6 pm (last admission to the galleries at 5:30 pm)

Admission Fee

Adult € 7.50
Child from 12 to 17 years/student € 5
Child from 7 to 11 years € 3.50
Person with disability € 3.50
Child – 7 years free
st Sunday of the month free for individuals
Family package: For 3 tickets bought, 1 child’s admission is offered
Audioguide 4 €

Contact Information

Address: 99 rue Claude Monet  27620 Giverny 

Phone:+33 (0) 2 32 51 94 65 

Email:contact@mdig.fr

To book, click here. 

3.Amsterdam

Amsterdam Rijksmuseum

Amsterdam, Netherlands takes about 3 to 4 hours by train from Paris, but the long haul ride is worth it once you start exploring this charming, historic city. Its city center is easy to explore by foot, making it an ideal day tour from Paris.

While in Amsterdam, make sure you explore the canals either by foot or boat, especially the three main canals Herengracht, Prinsengracht, and Keizersgracht. All dug in the 17th century during the Dutch Golden Age, they are surrounded by some of the most beautiful traditional Dutch houses that Amsterdam is famous for.

A must visit are the Dam Square with the Royal Palace with its impressive buildings,  the Begijnhof where you’ll see one of the two original wooden houses in Amsterdam, and the floating flower market.

If you must be at a museum, make it either one of the three:

Van Gogh Museum, Rijksmuseum, or Anne Frank House, or all if you booked tickets in advance. If you fancy a beer or just want to learn its history, check out Heineken’s oldest brewery, now converted into an interactive museum. For some unique, stroll along the Nine Streets, the area is famous for independent boutiques, specialty stores, and vintage shopping.

Opening Hours

Van Gogh Museum

29 April – 20 June 2019 – 9 am to 6 pm, Fridays 9 am to 9 pm

21 June – 1 September 2019- 9 am to 7 pm, Fridays and Saturdays 9 am to 9 pm

2 September – 27 October 2019-9 am to 6 pm, Fridays 9 am to 9 pm

28 October – 22 December 2019-9 am to 5 pm, Fridays 9 am to 9 pm

23 December – 31 December 2019*9 am to 7 pm, Fridays and Saturdays 9 am to 9 pm *With the exception of public holidays

Public holidays-Christmas (25 December) and New Year’s Eve (31 December) 9 am – 5 pm. New Year’s Day (1 January ) 11 am – 7 pm

Admission Fee

Adults€ 19

Visitors under 18free (school groups excluded)

Museumkaart holders- Free

Contact Information

Address:  Museumplein 6 1071 DJ Amsterdam

Phone: +31 (0)20 570 5200

Email:info@vangoghmuseum.nl

4.Loire Valley Castles

Loire Valley Castles France

Known as the “Garden of France”, and only two to three hours from Paris, Loire Valley is an area known for its opulent castles of the ancient nobility of France. It is one of the prettiest day tours from Paris if you want that feeling of being in a completely different world or era.

Loire Valley is also known for its architectural heritage and historic towns such as Amboise, Montsoreau, Orléans, Saumur and Tours, and particularly for its stunning châteaux.

Two castles you must visit are Chateau Chambord (often referred to as the “Beauty and the Beast” castle) and Chateau de Chenonceau (from the movie “Ever After”). Go in and wander around, marvel at its details both inside and outside on the grounds and in the gardens.

Aside from the castles, Loire Valley is also known for its wineries, many of which offer tours for wine tasting.

Opening Hours

From 17th February to 31st March: 10.00 am – 6.00 pm
From 1st April to 30th September: 10.00 am – 7.00 pm
From 1st October to 11th November: 10.00 am – 6.00 pm
Last admissions 1hour before closing.

Admission Fee

Adult (+ 16 yrs): € 14
Children from 8 to 16 yrs: € 4
Children (- 8 yrs): Free
Audio-guide: € 3
Groups of adults (more than 20 people): € 8
Groups of children (under16 yrs): € 3.50
Free entry for group organizers and coach drivers

Contact Information

Address: Château d’ Ussé 37420 Rigny-Ussé

Phone:+33 2 47 95 54 05

Email: chateauusse@gmail.com

To book, click here.

5.Mont Saint Michel

Mont Saint Michel France

A UNESCO World Heritage site and one of the most stunning places you’ll ever see during a Paris day trip Mont Saint-Michel is surely worth the few hours train ride and the hike. From afar, Mont St Michel is a picture-perfect mound, surrounded by a wall, covered in a grey-roofed medieval village and topped with a dramatic gothic abbey.

Its main attraction is the spectacular Norman Benedictine Abbey of St Michel, which sits on the peak of the rocky island, completely surrounded by its medieval town.

To fully appreciate and explore Mont Saint-Michel though, make sure you enter through the original gates.  Walk through the main street as it winds around the island up and past souvenir shops and restaurants. Stop and visit the small but interesting historical and maritime museums then continue up and wander through the narrow corridors of the abbey.

Still, one of the best parts about the visit to Mont Saint-Michel is the view from afar so stay until sunset and nightfall to see the lights twinkling, making the place look like something out of a medieval fairytale.

Opening Hours

The abbey is open every day except the 1st of January, the 1st of May and the 25th of December.
2 May to 31 August: 9 am to 7 pm, last admission at 6 pm.
1 September to 30 April: 9.30 am to 6 pm, last admission at 5 pm.

Admission Fee

Prices for 4 museums
Adults from 25 years old: 18 €
Adults between 18 and 25 years old: 12€
Under 18 years old: Free of charge

Prices for 2 museums (valid during winter closure)
Adults from 25 years old: 12€
Adults between 18 and 25 years old: 9€
Under 18 years old: Free of charge

1 museum
Adults from 18 years old: 9 €
Adults between 18 and 25 years old: 4 €
Under 18 years old Free of

Groups

Prices for 4 museums: Adults from 18 years old: 9 €
Less than 18 years old: Free of charge
Prices for 2 museums: Adults from 18 years old: 6 €
Less than 18 years old: Free of charge
1 museum: Adults from 18 years old: 4 €
Less than 18 years old: Free of charge

Contact Information

Address: Michel Normandy Boulevard de l’Avance 50170

Phone:02 33 89 80 00

Email: tourisme.lemontsaintmichel @ msm-normandie.fr

To book, click here.

6.Brussels

Brussels

Known for its history, the baroque architecture, and some of the world’s best chocolate, Brussels offers a wide variety of things to do and see, even if you’re only going to be here for a day. Only an hour and twenty minutes by rail, Brussels is one of the best day trips from Paris, as it gets you out of France completely and allows you to see another country and back in under 24 hours.

Start exploring Brussels at the magnificent gold tipped Grand Palace. This is one of Europe’s most impressive squares where you can marvel at some of Brussels’ famous baroque architecture. Visit the 14th Century Gothic cathedral The Notre Dam Du Sablon, and the Palais Royal which remains the official residence of the royal family.

Don’t miss the Manneken Pis, the small bronze sculpture of a naked boy peeing into a fountain which has now become a national symbol. In between visiting every attraction, enjoy some Belgian delights like waffles, pomme frites (chips/French fries), beer and don’t forget the fabulous hand made chocolates which you can bring back to Paris.

7.Great Stables of Prince de Conde & Palace Chantilly

Chateau de Chantilly France

Located in Rue du Connétable and built in the middle of the waters, is the Chantilly Estate. It is around 7800 hectares of forest and only 25 minutes away from the French capital, making it an ideal day tour from Paris if you want to venture into something unusual.

The Chantilly Estate has the castle, the Condé museum, the park, the Grandes Ecuries, and the Musée du Cheval. Take a tour inside the Chateau de Chantilly, built by Henri d’Orléans, Duke of Aumale, son of Louis-Philippe, the last king of France. The Chateau de Chantilly is a well-known French château and it houses the Musée Condé, one of the finest art galleries in France which own the second biggest collection of ancient paintings after the Louvre.

The Grandes Ecuries hold the Musée du Cheval and horse shows where you can watch the country’s most famous racers, get lost in a fascinating history lesson about the estate’s culture, architecture, cuisine and more.

Outside in the huge grounds, enjoy a stunning view of the gardens, and make sure you enjoy a delicious meal at the Chantilly Domain, and sample some delicious goat’s cheese.

Opening Hours

High season
From March 30, 2019, to October 27, 2019, inclusive
Open 7/7 including holidays
10h-18h / 20h for the park

Exceptional closure :
Wednesday, July 17, 2019: the entire Domaine de Chantilly is closed to the public.Thursday, July 18, 2019: Les Grandes Ecuries, the exhibition Joconde Nue at the Jeu de Paume and the English Garden will not be open to the public.

Low season
From October 28th, 2019 to March 27th, 2020 included
Every day except Tuesday
10h30-17h / 18h for the park

Annual closure :
From January 06 to January 24, 2020

Admission Fee

Park
Adult – €8
Children from 7-17yrs old- €6
Children under 7- Free

Domain
Adult – €17
Children from 7-17yrs old- €13.50
Children under 7- Free

Equestrian Show
Adult – €21
Children from 7-17yrs – €17
Children under 3years- Free

Domain Equestrian Show

Adult – €30
Children from 7-17yrs – €24
Children under 3years- Free

Domain Family Ticket
Adult /Children from 7-17yrs – €48
Children under 7years- Free

Contact Information

Address: 7 rue du Connétable 60500 Chantilly

Phone: +33 (0) 3 44 27 31 80

To book, click here.

8.Cologne

Cologne Cathedral Paris

Cologne doesn’t always come to mind when planning for a day trip from Paris, but at only a little over 3 hours by train from the French capital, this German city is slowly becoming a must-visit for travelers.

The tour often starts at the Cologne Cathedral, which towers at almost 160 meters over the houses and is the city’s main landmark. If you’re up to it, climb the 509 steps to the top of the tower, pass by the church bell, called “Dicker Pitter” and enjoy the scenic view over the city and the Rhine.

Adjacent to the Cathedral is the historic center with old, colorful houses, where you’ll see Tünnes und Schäl, two figures that represent the original Kölsch inhabitants, and marvel at the town hall and tower. When you get hungry, try some Cologne dishes such as “Himmel un Aed” or “Halve Hahn”.

Go museum hopping and check out some modern art at the Ludwig Museum or art from the Middle Ages to the Impressionist era in the Wallraf-Richartz Museum, while you can learn about the city’s Roman past at the Roman-Germanic Museum. Before going back to Paria, relax with a cup of coffee along with a piece of cake at the 150-year old Café Reichard for a wonderful view of the Cathedral.

Opening Hours

Cologne Cathedral
Monday -Saturday
10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m.
Sunday and Feastday
2:30 p.m.

Admission Fee

Adults: €8
Children and Students:€8
In the case of special events, short term changes are possible.

Contact Information

Address: Kölner Dom Domkloster4  50667 Köln

Phone: +49 221 – 17940-200

Email:domseelsorge@metropolitankapitel-koeln.de

9.Rouen and Honfleur

LeVieux Bassin Pord de Honfleur

Both a haven for painters and artists from all around the world, a visit to Honfleur and Rouen is one the best day tours from Paris that’s bound to have you snapping pictures at every turn. Close to each other and within a few hours from the capital, both Places are regarded as some of the prettiest places in France.

Honfleur’s major attraction is the LeVieux Bassin (Pord de Honfleur), and the port itself is surrounded by rows of colorful 17th and 18th-century narrow houses which provide a perfect backdrop for hundreds of picture-perfect scenery. It is also home to delicious French and Mediterranean cuisine, pretty cobblestone streets, and impressive architecture.

While in Honfleur, make sure you visit the famous Saint Catherine’s Church, Saint-Leonard’s Church, Notre-Dame de Grace, Normandy Bridge, and the amazing Jardin des Personalities.

Rouen is a charming town in the Normandy region of France, and on the train ride going here, way you’ll pass through the gorgeous countryside of the Seine Valley. Here you’ll find brightly colored half-timbered buildings, a gorgeous cathedral, and a fancy astronomical clock tower. Rouen is also home to the site of Saint  Joan of Arc’s execution and La Tour Jeanne d’Arc, the tower where she was held.

Like Honfleur, Rouen was a source of inspiration for many known French artists, including Pissarro and Monet. A must see is the Museum of Fine Arts considered as one of the best of its kind in the region.

To book click here.

10.Normandy

Omaha Beach Normandy

Whether you fancy yourself as a bit of a history nut or simply into setting out into something different and memorable during a day trip from Paris, Normandy is the perfect place to explore.

Only a few hours by rail from the French capital, the entire area of Normandy, located north-west of Paris, is rural and scenic and visiting the D-Day beaches is something that will stay with you even after you’ve left the place.

Apart from being the site of the infamous D Day landings, Normandy is also a picturesque place for a day out, despite its poignant history. Make sure you visit the Arromanches’ artificial harbor, Colleville-sur-Mer’s American military century, Omaha Beach and Pointe du Hoc for a full understanding of the events of the war.

Walk around the extensive Memorial de Caen which explores the history behind D Day and the Second World War. Both moving and beautiful, a visit to Normandy is definitely something worth considering when you wish to venture out of Paris for a day.

To book, click here.

11.Frankfurt

Frankfurt old town

This old imperial city on the River Main is mostly known as an important commercial and economic center. Frankfurt is considered a global city and frequently ranks in the top ten best cities to live and do business. Less than four hours from Paris via the fastest train route, Frankfurt is also a hub for cultural and tourism activities such as the Frankfurt Book Fair (the world’s most important publishing event).

It also has a number of fine museums, impressive architecture, huge garden parks, and a stunning gothic cathedral — making it a worthwhile day trip from Paris if you’re keen on venturing to a different country.

In the heart of Frankfurt’s Old Town is the Römerberg,  with the Justice Fountain at its center,  surrounded by open-fronted shops, and the Römer, which is made up of 11 lovely buildings, faithfully reconstructed in 1954 from original 15th- to 18th-century floorplans.

Make sure you spend time at the Museum District, with its collection of separate museums, such as the Museum of World Cultures, Museum of Ancient Sculpture and The Icon Museum. Relax at the Palm Garden, the 54-acre botanic garden in Germany, and afterward, visit the Senckenberg Natural History Museum, one of the most modern museums of natural history in Europe. Slow down at the end of your Frankfurt tour at St. Bartholomew’s Cathedral, built of red sandstone in Gothic style and at 95 meters, still manages to stand out in this city of skyscrapers.

12.Bruges

Bruges Belgium

Often cited as one of the most romantic destinations in Europe. picturesque Bruges (in Belgium)  is one of the easiest city to get to across the border if you’re in Paris and want to be in a different country for a day.

With its flower-lined canals, colorful Flemish architecture, quaint side streets and delicious gourmet food, Bruges has that postcard prettiness visitors often look for when going to Europe.

A UNESCO world heritage site, Bruges has a charming historical center, lined with impressive architecture from as early as the 12th century. Another must visit is the Groeningemuseum, that features the works of Flemish painters such as van Eyck and Bosch. While in Bruges, make sure you try local dishes such as Moules-Frites (mussels and chips) for lunch, accompanied by locally brewed Belgian beers, and, of course, chocolate.

To book, click here.

13.London

London Eye

Thanks to the Eurostar — Europe’s ever-reliable high-speed underground train, a day trip from Paris to London is not just possible, it’s actually very manageable. It only takes three hours, and if you leave Paris early you’ll get to thoroughly enjoy London even if you only have a day to spare.

Explore London’s many famous landmarks from either side of the Thames: the London Eye, Big Ben, the Houses of Parliament the Tower of London, Trafalgar Square and more.

London’s best sights are usually within walking distance from each other,  so spend the day wandering through political and historical points of significance, also with the help of the well-connected London Underground or the massive London buses.

In between, head to Spitalfields or Borough Market for a taste of lunch from around the world, or visit any of the tiny shops and stalls for some fish and chips or an elaborate afternoon tea. Slow down at the end of the day with a visit to the Kew Gardens or the ‘secret garden’ at Battersea Park.

And before you know it, you’ll be heading back to Paris to sleep.

Opening Hours

1st – 31st May
Open daily 10:00 – 20:30

Contact Information

Address: The London Eye Riverside Building County Hall Westminster Bridge Road London SE1 7PB

Phone: +44 870 990 8881

Email:londoneye@stripecommunications.com

To book, click here

 


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15 Best Day Trips From Berlin, Germany

A haven for art and culture nerds, history buffs and even for those who enjoy clubbing, Berlin pretty much has everything you need that venturing out might not appeal to you. However, this city, with its easily accessible and convenient transport system also provides travelers with an ideal starting point for exploring not just nearby cities and towns; but also the rest of Germany and even extending as far as the border, taking you to a different country in less than four hours.

Outside Berlin, you can visit quaint little towns nestled on hills or along the rivers, pristine parks, colorful castles, a grand film studio, and even a necessary history lesson during a tour of camps and memorials.

Here are fifteen exciting destinations outside cosmopolitan Berlin, all easily accessible and definitely worth your time.

 

15 Day Trips From Berlin

1.Potsdam

Potsdam Berlin

Berlin, with an eclectic mix of new and old, is without question one of Germany’s most vibrant and culturally rich cities. If you want to take a break from its fast-paced energy though, the nearby Potsdam offers a chance to chill and relax even while exploring grand royal residences, historical sights, and fairy-tale gardens, making for an exciting day trip. Accessible through a train ride from Berlin’s Central Station either by S-Bahn or regional trains which are often slightly faster, Potsdam is can be reached in under 50 minutes.

The city has excellent public transport connections, which makes exploring even easier. Potsdam is packed with attractions and must visit locations that a one day trip will not be enough.

However, if you’re pressed for time but want to make the most of your Potsdam day trip from Berlin, it is best to start at the Old Dutch Quarter. Its red-bricked architecture is unique, not only in Germany but in all of Europe. Even in the Netherlands, finding buildings that match Jan Bouman’s 18th-century creations in Potsdam is impossible.

Still in the Old Dutch Quarter, be sure to check out the deliciously-medieval Nauener Tor, with its majestic 18th-century Gothic Revival architecture. Along with the Brandenburg Gate (in Potsdam, not Berlin) and Hunters’ Gate (Jägertor), Nauener Tor makes up the trifecta of Potsdam’s original city gates along the now-defunct city wall.

After Nauener Tor, stroll around the Hegelallee then towards  Potsdam’s most iconic attraction – the Sanssouci Park. Spend time wandering through the gardens and palaces of Sanssouci and find out why Potsdam is one of the most loved German destinations among travelers.  The three major palaces — Sanssouci Palace (Schloss Sanssouci), Orangery Palace (Orangerieschloss), and New Palace (Neues Palais) are built in different architectural styles and are worth visiting as you explore the park.

Venture inside each of these for a taste of the grandeur that King Frederick the Great of Prussia enjoyed. These grand summer residences have stunning interiors and extensive park grounds complete with large fountains, beautiful terraced gardens, and vineyards.

To book, click here. 

Contact Information

Address: Humboldtstraße 1-214467 Potsdam

Phone:+49 (0)331 27 55 88 99

Emailinfo@potsdam-tourism.com

2.Rakotzbrücke (Devil’s Bridge)

Rakotzbrücke Devils Bridge Berlin

Train schedule:

One of the most famous and scenic photos you’ll ever come across on the internet is that of a bridge arched in a perfect half circle, that along with its reflection on the still waters below gives the optical illusion of a perfect circle. That stunning piece of architecture is the Devil’s Bridge, or the Rakotzbrücke  – one of the most picturesque bridges in all of Germany.

Just over two hours each way if you rent a car or transfer between trains and buses, the Rakotzbrücke is situated in the Azalea and Rhododendron Park about 100 miles southeast of Berlin. There are no convenient buses or trains to the area as there are no major cities nearby, but a visit to the park to see the Devil’s Bridge is still one of the more popular day trips from Berlin.

Commissioned in 1860 by the Knight of Kromlau, the bridge is accessible 24 hours a day, seven days a week  Be there by sunrise or stay until sunset to get the most spectacular views of this architectural masterpiece.

Contact Information:

Address: Old Castle 11  02953 Gablenz / OT Kromlau

Phone: 03576-222828

Email: info@kromlau-online.de

3.Szczecin, Poland

Stare Miasto Szczecin, Poland

When planning day trips from Berlin, it is easy to just consider places that are still part of the map of Germany. However, you’ll find that 150 kilometers northeast and only two hours by train, bus, or car from the German capital is the lovely Polish city of Szczecin. This city may not be as big and popular as Krakow, Gdansk or Warsaw, but Szczecin doesn’t disappoint. It has all the things that are so distinctly Polish —from stunning historical architecture to good beer & hearty food.

When in Szczecin, it is best to start your day tour in Stare Miasto, the city’s historic district. Visit the Hay Market Square, the main square of Stare Miasto where Szczecin’s Hanseatic roots are prominently on display.

Make sure you don’t miss out on the most important historical site in Szczecin – the Ducal Castle. Originally built in the mid-14th century and reconstructed after WWII, this towering Gothic and mannerist castle was once home to the dukes of Pomerania. Explore the grounds to see more of the castle’s unique architectural palette before venturing into the Castle Museum. Also within the castle grounds is the Pomeranian Dukes’ crypt and the bell tower (open only from May 1 to Sept 30) for scenic views of the city.

When in Szczecin, be sure to try the tasty perogies at Harnaś,  stroll around the Solidarity Square, watch a performance at The Philharmonic, or take in the impressive architecture at Wały Chrobrego.

4.Döberitzer Heide

Döberitzer Heide

If you are the active type who enjoys hiking and exploring nature parks while immersing in  300-year military history, then this day tour from Berlin is a must. Located on the west of Berlin, Döberitzer Heide is only twenty minutes by train from the German capital and several more minutes of brisk walking to reach the park.

The Döberitzer Heide is a vast protected area that was used as a military training camp since the 18th Century. Presently, it is covered with heathland and is home to wild horses, bison and other wild animals. The signages throughout the park that were supposed to guide hikers were mostly rundown but it is easy enough to find your way around. In Döberitzer Heide you will see the first military airfield in Germany, where the “Red Baron” Manfred von Richthofen once flew. You’ll also come across the Krampnitz barracks, the remains of the operational-tactical missile systems of the Soviet troops and shooting ranges, where the machine guns of the aircraft were calibrated.

The Döberitzer Heide is divided into several sections. The middle of the park is a nature reserve and blocked off by a series of electric fences, while the military zone has a sign warning visitors that firearms are in use to deter any lost visitors from exploring any further. It is recommended to join a group tour or hire a guide when going to Döberitzer Heide to avoid any inconvenience as the place is still littered with ruins and rubble from its historic past.

To book, click here. 

5.Hamburg

Hamburg Germany

A visit to Hamburg deserves an entire weekend, but if you’re pressed for time, it can also be done as a day trip from Berlin. Known as Germany’s biggest port town, it takes two hours via train northwest of the German capital to reach Hamburg.

Formerly infamous for its seedy, red-light Reeperbahn district, Hamburg has evolved into a more sophisticated city, with structures like the gleaming, new Philharmonic building, to its impressive art museum and gorgeous Alster Lakes. While the seedy area is still there (and worth a peek), you’re here to see more of Hamburg to know why it is presently regarded as one of the best cities to visit from Berlin.

As a port city, Hamburg is very different from the German capital, but there’s still so much to see and do here that makes it a worthwhile visit. Spend your day by wandering through the Speicherstadt, touring the new Elbphilharmonie, taking a quick river cruise, or indulging your inner child at Miniatur Wunderland.

You can also wander among the boats tied up in the harbour, or explore the famous fish market. If you’re into something more thrilling, check out Heide Park and experience the twists and turns of its rollercoasters.

Hamburg was granted a UNESCO World Heritage status in 2015 and as you see more of  Germany’s second-largest city, you’ll soon find out that it is so well deserved.

6.Dresden

Frauenkirche Dresden

Graced by the presence of River Elbe, and proudly standing as the capital of the Free State of Saxony, Dresden is an underrated baroque paradise that seems to have been taken straight out of picture books. This city was devastated by the second world war in 1945 but has managed to rise from the ruins in a slow but steady process that is still taking place.  As one of the more fascinating day tours from Berlin, Dresden promises not just a glimpse into its history but architectural marvels and a  taste of its culture as well.

Start with a visit to the Frauenkirche, a Protestant church built in the 18th century, that was destroyed during the 1945 bombings. It was left in ruins for many years until it was successfully restored to its former glory and is once again serving as the city’s most recognizable landmark since 2005. Another must-see is the Procession of Princes, a mural made up of 24.000 tiles located right in the city center. Depicting the history of Saxony rulers, it is also the biggest porcelain artwork in the world.

After walking through the entire mural, you will reach Dresden’s waterfront,  — the Bruhl Terrace. It ia also known as the balcony of Europe and offers the best views of River Elba and Old Town. From there you can visit more of Dresden’s architectural and historic treasures, places that were destroyed by the second world war that were rebuilt and restored. It is difficult to miss the Hofkirche or the Dresden Cathedral, that stand side by side with the equally stunning Dresden Royal Palace. There’s also the Zwinger, a rococo palace with pretty courtyard gardens and the Semperhoper (Opera House) which is both an institution and city icon.

Finally, a day trip to Dresden won’t be complete without dropping by the Altmafkt, considered as the best Christmas market in Europe. Also known as the heart of Dresden, it has historically been the place of mass gatherings and markets, with its architecture mirroring the city’s history in the past century.

Admission Fee

Free admission, donations are requested.

To book, click here.

Opening Hours

Central Church Tour

Usually Monday to Saturday at 12 o’clock and Monday to Wednesday and Friday at 18 o’clock.

Contact Information

Address: Stiftung Frauenkirche Dresden  Georg-Treu-Platz 3  01067 Dresden

Phone:+49 (0) 351-656 06 100 

Email:stiftung@frauenkirche-dresden.de

7.Sachsenhausen Memorial

Sachsenhausen Crematorium Memorial Berlin

To book, click here.

Opening Hour

15th March to 14th October: daily 8:30 am – 6:00 pm

15th October to 14th March: daily 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

Contact Information

Address: Straße der Nationen 22  D-16515 Oranienburg 

Phone:+49 (0) 3301 200-0

Email: visitor service @ gedenkstaette-Sachsenhausen. de

George Santayana said “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” and this is what comes to mind when visiting a city as historically rich as Berlin. Exploring in and around the German capital gives you a chance to spend time at the nearby Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp, located 35 km North of Berlin.

A visit to Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp is far from being ‘fun’,  but if you have even a passing interest in 20th-century history, a trip this former Nazi concentration camp is one of the most important and sobering tours you’ll take in and around the German capital.

Sachsenhausen is the closest camp to Berlin, and you can take a tour of its premises to learn more about the horrific reality of life at a Nazi concentration camp, and a grim reminder of the horrors of the WWII era. This concentration camp was under the Nazis and later the Soviets, and is a significant place in 20th Century history. It is presently a museum, where visitors get to see the cells, labour rooms, and gas chambers. The poignant memorial displays are worth a visit, and ‘Arbeit Macht frei’ (work will set you free) still hangs imposingly above the entrance.

There are definitely more enjoyable day trips from Berlin, but it’s important that places like Sachsenhausen are open to the public and that people actually go and visit them. A visit might leave you feeling sad, but this day trip certainly provides a worthwhile history lesson.

8.Babelsberg Film Studio

Babelsberg Film Studio Berlin

Founded in 1912, Studio Babelsberg is the oldest large-scale studio complex in the world and is presently one of Europe’s leading service providers for film and TV production. Located in Potsdam-Babelsberg, a day trip from Berlin to this impressive studio complex is a must for film buffs, or for anyone looking for a unique adventure outside the German capital.

Many of Germany’s most famous classic films were shot in Studio Babelsberg, such as  Fritz Lang’s Metropolis and Josef von Sternberg’s The Blue Angel, starring Marlene Dietrich. More recent movies that were filmed here are Quentin Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds, Roman Polanski’s The Ghost Writer and Roland Emmerich’s Anonymous. The studio complex occupies a 39-acre lot, with 16 sound stages, back lots and exterior sets. It is renowned for its first-class technical capabilities, highly skilled crew, attractive filming locations nearby and its proximity to the cosmopolitan Berlin. The back lots alone are already worth the visit, as they feature stunning permanent sets used in films.

The Berliner Street set is a permanent exterior film set modeled after a typical Berlin street setting. Built im 1998, the set stands on a 1.7acre lot and includes 26 facades, which resemble a typical urban architecture of the late 19th, early 20th century. These sets can be easily dressed to look like European cities such as Paris, Rome or London. Another must-see is the Village of the Middle Ages set, which was built for a movie in 1984.

There is a lot to see in Babelsberg, and you shouldn’t skip a visit to the Props Department, the ateliers of the Art Department, the legendary hall of Marlene Dietrich, or the historical Tonkreuz for a fascinating look at how experienced designers and the world’s best filmmakers work, and enjoy insights into the world of film. While in Babelsberg,

you also get to visit Potsdamer Platz, the venue for the yearly Berlinale film festival and see more of the area that houses over 200 companies involved in the film industry. Explore further and you’ll also find yourself in

Neu-Babelsberg, where you will find magnificent villas owned by celebrities. Many other affluent people from business and politics also live in this exclusive area.

To book, click here. 

Contact Information

Address: Studio Babelsberg AG August-Bebel-Str. 26-53 14482 Potsdam, Germany

Phone:+49 331 721 00 00

Email:info@studiobabelsberg.com

9.Bad Muskau

Bad Muskau Berlin

Situated against the border that separates Germany and Poland, the tiny spa village of Bad Muskau is in itself, one big attraction. The quaint park town was heavily devastated by the last battle of World War II in 1945,  and in the same year, the park was divided between Germany and Poland when the Neisse River became the new border.

It is not quite easy to get to this picturesque town by the border, as if involves a train ride from the German capital to Weiβwasser which takes 2 hours and 10 minutes, then a 20-minute cycle to Bad Muskau but it’s one of the most worthwhile day tours from Berlin that you could experience.

The main reason people take time to visit Bad Muskau is because of Muskauer Park, a verdant masterpiece of 19th-century celebrity landscape gardener Prince Hermann von Pückler. ‘Prince Pickle’, as the English used to call him, worked on the park for nearly 30 years but never completed his ‘painting with plants’, because debt forced him to sell the estate in 1844. Nevertheless, his garden project set the bar high for landscapers to follow, that his work even inspired a compilation of meticulous instruction manual on landscaping techniques.

Muskau Park is officially called the Fürst-Pückler-Park Bad Muskau. It is one of Central Europe’s largest and most famous gardens. It was added to the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2004, and at present, you can go to the Museum, walk around the gardens, go to the cafe, and have a picnic. A must see in the park are its luscious English gardens and the Neo-Renaissance pink castle surrounded by a small lake. What makes this park extra special is that its geography extends to both Germany and Poland, which means that a stroll through the entire park is also a visit two countries.

Bad Muskau is also just 10 to 15 minutes away by bike or car from Kromlau Park (where you can find the Devil’s Bridge) so if you’re going to one of these places, it makes sense to combine them for a day trip.

Opening Hours (Muskau Park)

29th May to 4th August 2018, daily 10 am – 6 pm

Admission Fee

Free

Contact Information

Address:  02953 Bad Muskau, Germany

Phone: 035771-63100

Email: info@muskauer-park.de

10.Leipzig

Leipzig Markt Germany

Leipzig is often referred to as the cheaper and more laidback alternative to Berlin — a vibrant city packed full of culture, history, culinary delights, interesting nightlife, and a lively art scene. It is one of Germany’s current hot spots for the young, creative class, and also a place with a rich musical tradition, as it was once home to Johann Sebastian Bach.

Start your day in this vibrant city by exploring Leipzig Altstadt, which is about a 10-minute walk from the Hauptbahnhof to the Markt, or Market Square.  Along the way, you will find stunning examples of 19th and 20th century Saxon architecture,  with styles ranging from Art Nouveau to Post Modernist. If you are into music and art, be sure to check out the three-museums-in-one GRASSI, the Bach Museum and the Leipzig Museum of Fine Arts.

Aside from its Saxon architecture, impressive museums, and fantastic bars and clubs, Leipzig is also an excellent option for vegan travelers. The vegan culinary scene in Leipzig offers hungry vegan visitors loads of options such as vegan currywurst, vegan sushi, vegan pizza, and even vegan brunch.

The city is one of Germany’s top trade fair destinations, regularly attracting businesspeople from all around the world. Leipzig is just an hour and a half away from Berlin by bus and an easy place to explore on foot or by public transportation.

 11.Spreewald

Spreewald Berlin

One of the more unique Berlin day trips you can experience and just an hour away from the capital is a visit to Spreewald. Its name translates to ‘spree forest’

and is a UNESCO protected nature reserve that sprouts from the Spree River?

There’s hardly a better place to enjoy nature so close to Berlin than this picturesque forest, which has plenty of trails and tracks ideal for walking, cycling and exploring Spreewald. Make sure you stop at the lagoon village of Lehde, or the cute fishing village of Leipe, for a glimpse of rural German life.

Lübbenau, the Spreewald’s most popular tourist center is another must-visit and a good place to relax. If you’d rather explore Spreewald from the river, rent a kayak or canoe in Lübbenau or Burg and spend your day ambling through the waterways alongside traditional wooden houses, age-old bridges, and thick forests.

Aside from its breathtaking natural scenery, the Spreewald is home to the Sorbs, a Slavic tribe who settled here centuries ago. Spreewald also has old, traditional farmhouses along the waterways that give visitors an insight into its local history.

To book, click here

Contact Information

Address: Dammstraße 72, 03222 Lübbenau/Spreewald, Germany

Phone: +49 0172 7936587

Email:mueller.spreewald@gmail.com

 12.Köpenick

Town Hall Köpenick Berlin

Berlin’s Köpenick district is the site of a very old settlement dating back to the Bronze Age. Today, Köpenick is not only Berlin’s largest district, it’s the richest in terms of woodland and lakes. An estimated 80 percent of the district’s surface is covered by water, woodland, and grassland – making it the main recreation area in eastern Berlin. Köpenick is the best day trip from Berlin if you’re after a quaint small town feel, hiking through a forest and relaxing beach strolls. The district of Altstadt Köpenick and neighboring Friedrichshagen remain mostly unknown to hordes of tourists and you won’t find any international brand stores here. It is a mix of big, open neighborhoods,  cobblestoned streets lined with tiny local shops, and the rivers Spree and Müggelsee.

Start the day at Köllnischer Platz, not far from the Spindlersfeld S-­Bahn station, with an easy walk to the Schloss Köpenick, a well-preserved Baroque palace.  It used to be home to Prussian royalty, and presently houses Berlin’s Museum of Decorative Arts. Afterward, explore the pedestrian-friendly Old Town of Köpenick with its splendid architecture, particularly its Alte Rathaus, make sure to walk over Long Bridge or Lange Brücke – for its splendid views of the old moat and river.

Walk further and you’ll find Möllhausenufer, where you can enjoy a stroll along the shore while having currywurst and ice cream. Hike through the overgrown, ill-marked paths of the Wendenschloß woods to small, quiet beaches along the Müggelsee. In the middle of the forest and up the Kleiner Müggelberg is the Müggelturm, a 29.61m tower, offering one of the highest points from which to view Berlin

From the tower, get back on the trail and to the Am Müggelsee path. This is here the Müggelsee meets the Müggelspree, and you’ll find a quiet beach here before the Spree tunnel. Before crossing, visit the SpreeArche, a floating log cabin restaurant specializing in freshly smoked fish (usually salmon).

Make sure you have some German beer while in Köpenick or sample more local fare and even some international cuisine, head over to nearby Bölschestraße — a street lined with bookstores, bike shops, independent clothing stores and a number of restaurants.

To book, click here. 

 

13.Rüdersdorf

Schachtofenbatterie Museum Park Rüdersdorf

Going to Rüdersdorf is one of the most scenic boat tours you’d ever find yourself in, as this day trip from Berlin also allows you to stop at picturesque, historic towns of Friedrichshagen and Köpenick en route.

Boat trips and especially this one that’s headed for Rüdersdorf is always a great way to see more of the rural side of Germany. You get a glimpse of each riverside village that you pass by, marvel at the stunning architecture and how the skyline looks so pretty that you won’t stop snapping photos or recording videos.

Once you reach Rüdersdorf, explore the well-known Museum Park. The area in Rüdersdorf is a large open-air industrial museum that showcases the extraction and processing of limestone from the Rüdersdorfer Kalkberg. The Rüdersdorfer Kalkberg is the largest limestone deposit in northern Germany, and these limestones are processed as a stone and as quicklime or cement used as building materials for most structures in Berlin.

The Museum Park features an Exhibition Hall, the Kalkscheune which was a former lime kiln warehouse that’s now used as a wedding venue, Chamber and Rumfordöfen, Canal structures, Sheave posts, and Shaft furnace plant.

There’s also a Crane park, an exhibition of cranes and construction machinery. When in Museum Park Rüdersdorf, be sure to also check out the Museum Zoo, which houses farm animals from the region, as well as a small petting zoo.

Opening Hour

April to October

daily 10.00 am – 6.00 pm

November to March

Tue. – Sun. 10.30am – 4.00pm

Admission Fee

Children 6 to 16 years 3.00 €

Annual pass 25,00 € / reduced 12,50 €

Annual pass plus 50,00 € / reduced 25,00 €

Incl. entrance to  Easter, Walpurgis, mountain festival, Halloween and fairytale magic

20% discount on tickets for selected  events (Kulturhaus and  Museum Park)

To book, click here. 

Contact Information

Address: Heinitzstrasse 9 15562 Rüdersdorf near Berlin

Phone: +49 33638 799797

Email:kasse@museumspark-kulturhaus.de

14.Wannsee

Wannsee Berlin

A quick getaway among Berliners especially during summer is Wannsee, the largest European inland beach that is ever-popular among tourists and locals alike. It is such a go-to getaway for most that sometimes it’s hard to find yourself a spot to lay your towel, but still, there’s more to it than being a summer destination.

Wannsee is the location of many wealthy Berlin residents’ summer homes or sailing yachts. Some of the most visited attractions are the sailing clubs, the Liebermann Villa museum, the beach promenade, peacock island, and the infamous Villa Marlier (now also a museum) which was the home of the many notorious decision made by the Third Reich.

Wannsee’s Strandbad, Europe’s largest inland outdoor beach, maybe notoriously crowded but it’s still among those favorite day trips from Berlin. Strandbad is a mix of vibrant energy and a quaint small town feel and offers more than a place to soak up the sun and swim.

After you’ve spent time at the beach, walk down Am Großen Wannsee to see some of Berlin’s most impressive historical homes. Visit the Liebermann Villa am Wannsee, the summer house of German painter Max Liebermann. You’ll also come across the House of the Wannsee Conference. the haunting location for the infamous Wannsee Conference where the “Final Solution to the Jewish Question” was settled during the second world war.

15.Wroclaw

Wroclaw Poland

Wroclaw is one of the most exciting places you could visit during a day trip from Berlin, with its impressive architecture, kind people, hearty food, quirky attractions, and grim history, given its location between Russia and Germany. Only under four hours by bus, private car or train form the German capital, you can cover so much of Wroclaw within a day.

A good way to explore the city while making sure you see all the sights is by hunting gnomes.

These gnomes began as an anti-Soviet protest against the communists during the 1980s. It started with Papa Gnome, who stands on a finger, at the meeting place of the rebels. Nowadays they are involved in different kinds of activities such as drinking, offering random passersby a slice if pizza or traveling somewhere holding his suitcase. There are over 300 dwarfs around the city and maps of where they are available in tourist information offices.

Walk around the center Rynek, or the Market Square, with its historic architecture and landscape. See the statue of Roland, a stunning glass fountain, the salt square and the Old Town Hall, which is one of the main landmarks of Wroclaw.

Explore the Old town, with its cobblestone streets and colored houses. Here, you cannot miss the Saint Elisabeth Church across the Market Square. It has a 90-m tall tower you can climb for scenic views of the city. Stroll along the Old Shambles its many galleries and different monuments of animals, if you’re into arts and more history.

See the Cathedral Island, the oldest part of the city of Wroclaw. with its fascinating medieval streets. This is a great place for a picturesque, romantic evening stroll, with street gas lamps still lit by hand by a lamplighter! Your next stop should be the Centennial Hall with the adjacent Multimedia Fountain called Hala Stuleciain Polish. Built in 1913, it is a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2006. The Centennial Hall was designed to be a multi-functional building that hosts various performance arts events but the main attraction is the magnificent Wroclaw Fountain. It is a colorful musical fountain that plays a video on the water, a stunning spectacle, especially in summer evenings. Nearby, you can also check out the Zoo and the Japanese Garden.

Other places worth mentioning are the University of Wroclaw – one of the oldest in Central Europe, and the Church of St. Stanislaw, Dorota, and Waclaw.  When taking breaks from exploring the city, make sure you sample some goulash, Polish gnocchi, Pierogies, and Polish ice cream.

 


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13 Day Trips From Budapest

Budapest is known for its many heritage sites which makes it a hotbed of tourist attractions and draws in millions of visitors every year. But while Budapest is a truly majestic place, there’s so much more to Hungary than its hugely popular capital.

Hungary may not be one of Europe’s largest countries, but it has one of the continent’s highest number of historic sites and tourist attractions, as well as stunningly beautiful scenery.

Budapest is situated on the banks of the Danube River, making it an ideal base from which to plan day trips to the seemingly endless number of villages, towns, and cities that surrounds the capital or even across the border.

So here’s a list of places you can visit and explore in a day, all within a few hours by train from Budapest.

 

13 Day Trips From Budapest

1.Puszta and Kecskemét

Kecskemét Town Hungary

The picture-perfect town of Kecskemét is located right at the heart of Hungary’s southern Great Plains region a scenic land of rivers and lakes, wheat fields and grassland marked by rustic farms.

Kecskemét is known for its architectural marvels, with stunning castles and palaces that are a haven for shutterbugs.  The Kecskemét Zoo, meanwhile, makes the town more ideal for families and anyone looking for a different yet fascinating day tour from Budapest. It is the best place to visit near Budapest for those who want to see more of the age-old architecture of Hungary that makes this country popular among history enthusiasts and art aficionados.

Aside from the colorful, ornate buildings, Kecskemét is also popular for its equine roots. Bring surrounded by Puszta or lowland prairies, you can also join tours that take you out into the Great Plains. In guided tours, you get to visit the popular horse shows at Bugac or

Lajosmizse, where Puszta horsemen perform in a show. Here you also get to experience a carriage ride, then enjoy traditional Hungarian meal served in a country tavern with Gypsy music.

Barely an hour and a half from Budapest by car or train, make sure to visit the other attractions at Kecskemét such as the Cifra Palace, Kecskemét Vadaskert and Co-Cathedral of the Ascension of the Lord.

To book, click here. 

 2.Visegrad

Visegrad Castle Budapest

The Danube Bend is one of the most stunning parts of Hungary, where the famous European river turns south and flows towards Serbia and Croatia. The sharpest bend in the river wraps around the small castle town of Visegrád, which has a lot of renaissance buildings and picturesque castles perched on hills.

The Visegrad Castle should definitely be part of your itinerary when you take this day trip from Budapest. It offers fantastic views of the Danube Bend, and also the most charming example of Hungary’s heritage and architecture. The castle is positioned at the top of a 350-meter hill, reachable via a steep hiking trail through the woods but you can also get a taxi to take you there if you don’t want to hike.

Inside, you’ll find an armory and a wax museum, but the real highlight is the beautiful panorama of the river alongside the area’s hills and valleys seen from the battlements. While in the castle, visit any of the cafés, and try the famous spritz wine.

At the bottom of the hill, there’s still so much to see in the town of Visegrád. You can visit the Renaissance palace ruins on the riverside or check out the Zugfozde Palinka Museum, dedicated to the Hungarian fruit brandy.

To book, click here.

Opening Hours

Monday-Sunday 9 am-6pm

Contact Information

Address: Visegrád, Várhegy, 2025 Hungary

3.Danube Bend and Vác

Danube Bend Budapest

In the west of Hungary and between Esztergom and Szentendre the gorgeous Danube River sharply bends towards the south and on this bend, you can find the charming little town of Vác.

In Vác’s historic center, you’ll find the impressive Cathedral of Mary’s Ascension, surrounded by streets of luxurious merchant’s homes. With 18th Century bridges, picturesque plazas, and Baroque churches, this little riverside town is both fascinating and romantic, perfect for a day trip from Budapest to escape the hustle of the Hungarian capital

You can enjoy scenic views of the town’s skyline, with its iconic church towers, from a river cruise or from Danube Island, accessible from Vác by car ferry.

To book, click here. 

 4.Eger

Eger Cathedral Hungary

Only a couple of hours by train from Budapest, the gorgeous town of Eger lies 140 kilometers east of Budapest on the southern slopes of the Bükk Mountains. It is one of the most beautiful small towns in Europe, known for its 17 Baroque churches, picturesque central plaza, thermal baths, and a Turkish minaret.

Some of the town’s main attractions are the Eger Basilica, with its twin towers and a wide stairway leading to its portico that offers scenic views of the town; the Dobó Castle Museum and the Baroque Lyceum, with its 53-meter-tall tower and revolving dome.

While in Eger, wander through the narrow lanes of the Old Town, where there’s a huge central market place and the stunning church of St. Anthony.

Finally, visit the medieval Castle of Eger and marvel at its 11th-century structure that has been expanded numerous times over the ages.

Opening Hours

Eger Cathedral

Weekend- 8:30 am- 6:00 pm

Admission Fee

No entrance fee, but  and accepting donations

Adult 300 Ft (€0.92)

Students and Pensioners  100Ft (€0.31)

which can only be thrown into the donation box.

To book, click here.

Contact Information

Address: Eger, Pyrker János tér 1, 3300 Hungary

Phone: (36) 515-725 

Email:bazilika.eger@gmail.com

5.Vienna

Vienna Austria

It is only about two and a half hours by train from Budapest to reach this enriching Austrian capital that’s a must visit for culture and history enthusiasts. A UNESCO heritage city since 2001, Vienna in one of the best day trips you can experience. Start with breakfast in one of the many cafés all over the city, and soak up its coffee culture. Pair your Viennese coffee with apple strudel, sit for a while before heading out to the Schonbrunn Palace. This palace also opens earlier than other attractions, making it a good place to start to make the most of your Vienna day trip. Schonbrunn Palace is one of the most renowned cultural and historical monuments in Austria and is known for being the summer residence of the much loved Princess Sisi.

Stephansplatz, in the heart of the city and considered as Vienna’s most important square is where you can find the St. Stephen’s Cathedral, which is one of the country’s most iconic buildings. Next, there’s the Mozarthaus, a 17th-century building which was Mozart’s home from 1785-1787 and is now a museum dedicated to the famous composer.

Lunch at Naschmarkt is a must, as there are dozens of food stalls selling everything from fresh fruits and vegetables to trail mixes to sausages and olives. After eating, relax at the Art History Museum or Belvedere. both set inside a palace.

Next is the Hofburg Palace, once the main imperial palace in Vienna and the seat of power for the Habsburg family. Today, it is the workplace for the president of Austria and home to three museums: the Sisi Museum, Imperial Apartments, and Silver collection.

A visit to Vienna won’t be complete without marveling at the Bauhaus and its glorious Gothic details, then sampling a Wienerschnitzel for dinner, before seeing a show at the historical Vienna State Opera. Lastly, have another cup of Viennese coffee at the Sacher Café paired with the delicious sacher torte.

To book, click here. 

6.Pécs

Pecs Hungary

Known for its mild climate and popular due to its location on the slopes of the Mecsek Mountains, it only takes two hours to reach the small town of Pécs from Budapest. This town has many historical and cultural attractions that date back to the 11th Century and graves dating back to the 3rd Century, medieval buildings and contemporary art galleries.

A horned of fascinating sites, Pécs’  most popular destinations in its fortified Old Town are the Cathedral Precincts surrounding the Cathedral of St. Peter, and the old graves just below the cathedral square and in the courtyards of the old houses. These dates back to the 3rd and 4th centuries, also regarded as the most important surviving examples of Early Christian culture in Hungary.

When in Pécs, make sure to explore Szénchenyi tér, a medieval market place in the heart of the Old Town.

To book, click here. 

7.Szentendre

Szentendre Hungary

The overground commuter train H5 from Budapest reaches Szentendre in only an hour, making it one of the top Budapest day trips. This is usually the first stop when on a trip to the Danube Bend and often comes with a trip to Esztergom and Visegrád. Szentendre is a small town on the hilly right bank of the Danube 20 km north of Budapest, and one of the most popular destinations for people from the capital. It is also called an “artist village” because the creative types that have been settling here since the 1930s.

Szentendre is a buzzing cultural hub in Hungary, known for museums, art galleries, and markets and restaurants. When in Szentendre, make sure you visit the Blagovescenska Church, a Serbian Orthodox place of worship built in 1752. The doorway is an interesting sight, with its Baroque curved balcony and a fresco above the side entrance depicting Emperor Constantine and his mother Helena with the cross of Christ. Make sure to check out Fő tér, the main square, with its Merchants’ Cross built following a plague, and the lovely old Church Square with design influences from the Catholic Croats of Dalmatia who settled around the church.

Other places you should see when in Szentendre are the Hungarian Open-Air Museum, Annunciation Church, Szamos Marcipan Museum and Margit Ceramic Museum.  Since this town is situated on the banks of River Danube, an idyllic stroll by the serene riverside is a great way to end your day in Szentendre.

To book, click here.

 8.Somló

Burg Somló Hungary

Somló is Hungary’s smallest wine region— much like a secret garden with its untouched vineyards and crumbling old houses. A fortified castle lies on top of the hill, and there are three Medieval churches. A visit to Somló won’t be like any other Budapest day tour you’ve ever experienced but a fascinating and rewarding one, nonetheless.

The Somló region consists mainly of vineyards covering just one pretty hill, which is an extinct volcano, giving a unique earthy flavor to the wines they produce. It is said that once you try a wine from Somló, you will forever recognize its taste. Somló wines tend to be elegant, high in alcohol, acidic, with lots of minerality and meant to be aged.

Somló maybe one of the smallest towns in Hungary, but a visit here offers a lot. With its cone-shaped volcanic hill that rises out of the plain north of Lake Balaton, you’ll get some seriously stunning views of surrounding areas.

It is where some of the country’s most unique and interesting white wines are produced. When you go on a day trip here, enjoy a visit to a winery on the northern side of Lake Balaton.  Marvel at the rolling hills above the lake that seemingly changes color from every angle, which is covered with a patchwork of grapevines, lavender fields, limestone, and scenic cellars.

To book, click here

 9.Miskolc

Miskolc Hungary

Going to Miskolc takes l a good two and a half hours from Budapest, but it has a lot to offer if you want to spend a day from the capital city. It is located in an area surrounded by stunning nature reserves, and among the most popular day trips from Budapest.

Miskolc’s most famous attraction is the network of thermal baths built into a cave, where you can also enjoy stunning views of the iconic Diósgyőr Castle, nearby Bükk National Park, and a picturesque forest train ride to the beautiful town of Lillafüred. You can also choose to rejuvenate at any of the thermal spas known for their therapeutic properties. A dip in this natural jacuzzi is sure to invigorate your senses, which is why Miskolc is one getaway you shouldn’t miss.

 Apart from the thermal baths and spas, Miskolc offers a variety of things to do in the town center and the surrounding nature reserves. You can hike through forests, explore wildlife or experience a State Forest railway ride. You can learn more about the city by spending time in Miskolc Zoo and Cultural Park.

10.Bratislava

Bratislava Slovakia

Located along Danube River and surrounded by mountains where castles, old churches, and historic plazas are a common sight, a day trip to the Slovakian capital Bratislava is something you should experience. It only takes 2 hrs 4 mins to reach Bratislava from  (and back) via a tourist train or private car.

If you only have a day to spend, make sure you check out the Old Town, an 18th-century village filled with bars and cafes. Check out the Church of St. Elisabeth or the “Blue Church”, and features an impressive Art Nouveau style design; the Clarissine Church, which showcases unique Gothic architecture, and St. Martin’s Cathedral, another Gothic-inspired church that’s considered the largest and the oldest church in Bratislava.

After you’ve said your prayers, look out for Bratislava’s quirky inanimate ‘residents’, sculptures that were made to make the city a livelier place. There’s Čumil the Peeper, who seems to be coming out of a manhole; the Paparazzi by Radko Macuha, Schone Naci and Napoleon’s Solder, both created by Juraj Melis.

When in Bratislava, it is a must to catch a glimpse of Michael’s Gate, the only remaining part of the medieval fortifications that once surrounded Bratislava and is now a famous tourist landmark.

Another definite must do is to climb up the Bratislava Castle. Located on a hill along the Danube River, the castle also houses artistic and historical exhibitions of the Slovak National Museum and offers a  stunning view of the city and the nearby areas.

Slow down and relax after all the walking and climbing by trying some Slovak food like the Slovak potato salad and beef stroganoff, then see if you can get tickets to a show at the Slovak National Theater. A strange, but interesting way to end your day in town is to head over to the UFO Observation Deck in central Bratislava. The viewing area shaped like a flying saucer is reachable by an elevator ride that will take less than a minute. The best time to come here is during sunset until late at night.

11.Lake Balaton

Lake Balaton Hungary

If you want to go beyond exploring old streets, monuments and castles, a tour of Lake Balaton is something you should experience. An easy day trip from Budapest, you can reach Lake Balaton via an hour of a scenic train ride. A beautiful freshwater lake in the Transdanubian region of Hungary, it is known as the Hungarian inner sea. You can enjoy a Lake Balaton cruise with one of the many tour operators in the area, where you’ll be on a journey over the glassy waters of the lake’s 50-mile long expanse.

Well known as a wine-growing region, this place also has beaches, volcanic hills, and swanky resorts. Lake Balaton is the largest freshwater lake in Europe and apart from cruising,  offers a variety of fascinating activities to do, from exploring lush, grassy landscapes to visiting vineyards and historic towns.

When in Lake Balaton, you can visit the photogenic town of Szigliget and see the Szigliget Fortress, or hike around the volcanic hills surrounding the lake which are home to scenic vineyards. Other places to see are the Balaton uplands, Tihany monastery, Tihany Felsziget, and Festetics Palace

To book, click here

12.Esztergom

 

Esztergom Basilica Hungary

One of the best day trips from Budapest, Esztergom sits perfectly on the Hungary- Slovakia border. It is one of the oldest towns in Hungary and lies about 60 km northwest of Budapest where the Danube breaks through the Hungarian Central Uplands. Esztergom is also the original capital of Hungary when it was founded as a nation back in 972. You can reach Esztergom by train within two hours, and its an ideal place to explore for its architectural significance as well as for its historical value.

Esztergom has vintage castles, cathedrals, boulevards, public squares, and cobblestoned alleys, which makes walking around the town center seem like you’re in another era. It has the largest church in Hungary the Esztergom Basilica — an imposing Cathedral with its entrance marked by two tall towers and several Corinthian Columns; the ruins of the 10th-century Hungarian Royal Palace and the adjacent Christian Museum with its collection of works of Hungarian Italian Renaissance artists.

If you are going to Esztergom by car, be sure to stop by the Pilis Mountains. Situated in the loop formed by the Danube Bend, this is a nature reserve known for its caves and fossils. Its mountain slopes covered mainly in forests of beech and oak with steep and picturesque chalk cliffs, and also a popular area for hikers and trekkers.

To book, click here

13.Győr

Gyor town hall Budapest

Situated on the Little Hungarian Plain is the quaint town of Győr, which is just over an hour away on the train from Budapest. It sits in the convergence of the rivers Danube, Rába, and Rábca, and is halfway between Budapest and Vienna. The Old Town area of Gyor, along with Chapter Hill and Royal Town is regarded as one of the most beautiful Renaissance and Baroque townscapes in Hungary. Gyor is home to no less than 170 listed buildings, perfect for walking around and learning about the town’s history and culture through its architecture.

Frequently listed as among the best day tours from Budapest, you’re about to experience a jampacked day when you visit Gyor. Some of its more notable attractions are the Vienna Gate Square, a lovely Baroque square surrounded by well-preserved 17th- and 18th-century homes, as well as the impressive Carmelite Church. When in Gyor, it is also a must to check out the Bishop’s Castle, that houses a museum, a 14th-century tower and was a residence of Bishop Kálmán (his coat-of-arms still adorns its front). Make sure you stop by the 11th-century Cathedral of the Virgin Mary and the eight-meter Ark of the Covenant Monument built at the request of Emperor Charles III and depicting two angels holding the Ark of the Covenant. There’s also the Iron Cockerel on the bank of the Mosoni Danube, which is also the town’s emblem and Széchenyi tér, the 17th-century Hungarian Old People’s Home still in use today.

A good way to relax after a day of exploring the Old Town is to enjoy a pleasant stroll along the converging rivers of the Danube, Rába, and Rábca.

To book, click here


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12 Day Trips From Vienna, Austria

While there is a great variety of attractions to fill your time in this beautiful Austrian capital, it is also a perfect base from which to explore a number of other popular European destinations.

Situated close to Slovakia, the Czech Republic, and Hungary,  Vienna affords travelers plenty of cross-country getaways with less hassle and expense. With the reliable European rail lines, Vienna is also an ideal starting point if you want to see more of Austria’s idyllic countryside villages, stunning castles, vineyards with wine-tasting opportunities, and breathtaking mountain landscapes.

Here is a selection of day trips from Vienna, with details about each destination. These can also be extended to an overnight or weekend stay, so you can make the most of your getaway.

12 Day Trips From Vienna, Austria

1.Hallstatt

Hallstatt Austria

Regarded by many as one of the most beautiful places on earth – Hallstatt is situated between the lake and the hills. A great base for hiking or trekking, Hallstatt offers not just a unique experience for a day trip out of Vienna, but unparalleled views and stunning landscapes as well.

Aside from its picturesque town center, there are a number of unique places to visit in Hallstatt. One of the most popular attractions is the Beinhaus or the Bone House. It is a small church that’s a delight for those who are into the strange and macabre, as inside this structure you will find human bones and skulls adorning the walls. With Austria being known for its ‘death culture’, relatives of those who passed on whose remains are used as church decor say it is their way of honoring their loved ones.

Another must see in Hallstatt are the salt mines, considered to be among the oldest in the world, dating back over 7,000 years.  The historic significance of these salt mines was why Hallstatt made it to the UNESCO Heritage list and it’s worth the excursion if you have the time, just make sure you book tickets in advance.

To book, click here.

2.Wachau Valley

Wachau Valley Durnstein

Stretching for about 40 kilometers between the towns of Melk and Krems, Wachau Valley is about an hour’s drive from Vienna. The picturesque Wachau Valley lies east of the Austrian capital and is a World Heritage Site because of its spectacular scenery and rich history and culture.

The Danube River runs through the valley, past monasteries, castles, villages, and vine-draped hills. A must visit in Wachau Valley is the magnificent Benedictine Melk Abbey, perched high on a hilltop, which is known as one of the finest Baroque churches north of the Alps.

Wachau Valley is Austria’s premier wine region,  and a day trip from Vienna to the Wachau Valley is a must for wine lovers. Here you can sample some of Austria’s most prized dry Rieslings and Grüner Veltliners.

The area is also popular among foodies and is one of the most popular places to visit near Vienna.

To book, click here.

3.Budapest

Royal Palace Budapest

At just a few hours by train, this mighty city along the Danube makes for a perfect day tour from Vienna. Budapest is a must visit for those who love architecture, a good blend of history and culture and a vibrant nightlife. It is regarded as one of the most beautiful and enjoyable cities in Europe, with its rich history and diverse attractions.

Easily accessible via train from Vienna, culture and history buffs will love exploring the castle district. It is recommended to visit the Royal Palace and Fisherman’s Bastion, cross the iconic Chain Bridge, stand at the center of Heroes Square and spend time on the Jewish quarter and City Park.

Also a haven for foodies, Budapest has a Central Market Hall with numerous stalls that sell authentic Hungarian dishes, traditional sweets, and treats. Before heading back to Vienna, check out Budapest’s nightlife, specifically at a Ruin bar. Set in abandoned buildings around town, Ruin bars offer the best drinks and the best parties in town.

To book, click here.

4.Lainzer Wildlife Park and Baden bei Wien in Vienna Woods

Lainzer Wildlife Park Vienna

A haven for animal lovers and for those who want an easier more relaxed day trip, Lainzer Wildlife Park is a nature reserve built on the Emperor’s former private hunting grounds. It occupies 24 square kilometers of the Vienna Woods, and known as a place of relaxation and escape from the big city. The animals are here all year round but during summer, you can frequently see wild pigs, deer, and elk frolicking through the woods and grasslands. This important conservation area also includes more than 80 kilometers of footpaths and the 14-meter high Hubertuswarte observation tower on the Kaltbründlberg.

Another attraction in Vienna Woods is the spa town of Baden bei Wien, known for its thermal waters even back in the Roman times. Today, the town’s sulfur springs are still their source of six-and-a-half million liters of therapeutic warm water every day. Apart from being a place for relaxation, Baden bei Wien also has a number of historic attractions, such as the ruins of Rauheneck and Rauenstein castles; Beethovenhaus, a 16th-century house where the composer spent the summers of 1821-1823; and the Rollettmuseum.

Opening Hours

15.Mar.2019 to 31.Oct.2019
Tuesday – Sunday, 10:00 – 18:00
on holidays, 10:00 – 18:00
Closed in winter (from the beginning of November until Easter time)

Admission Fee

Young people under 19 – Free
1st Sunday of the month: Free admission

Contact Information

Address:Lainzer Tiergarten, 1130 Wien

Phone: +43 1 4000 49 200 

Email:

5.Bratislava

Bratislava Slovakia

Located along Danube River and surrounded by mountains where castles, old churches, and historic plazas are a common sight, a day trip to the Slovakian capital Bratislava is something you should experience. Bratislava is not only a stunning historic city, but one filled with beautiful natural wonders as well. If you only have a day to spend, make sure you check out the Old Town, an 18th-century village filled with bars and cafes. Check out the Church of St. Elisabeth or the “Blue Church”, and features an impressive Art Nouveau style design; the Clarissine Churc, which showcases unique Gothic architecture, and St. Martin’s Cathedral, another Gothic-inspired church that’s considered the largest and the oldest church in Bratislava.

After you’ve said your prayers, look out for Bratislava’s quirky inanimate ‘residents’, sculptures that were made to make the city a livelier place. There’s Čumil the Peeper, who seems to be coming out of a manhole; the Paparazzi by Radko Macuha, Schone Naci and Napoleon’s Solder, both created by Juraj Melis.

When in Bratislava, it is a must to catch a glimpse of Michael’s Gate, the only remaining part of the medieval fortifications that once surrounded Bratislava and is now a famous tourist landmark. Another definite must do is to climb up the Bratislava Castle. Located on a hill along the Danube River, the castle also houses artistic and historical exhibitions of the Slovak National Museum and offers a  stunning view of the city and the nearby areas.

Slow down and relax after all the walking and climbing by trying some Slovak food like the Slovak potato salad and beef stroganoff, then see if you can get tickets to a show at the Slovak National Theater. A strange, but interesting way to end your day in town is to head over to the UFO Observation Deck in central Bratislava. The viewing area shaped like a flying saucer is reachable by an elevator ride that will take less than a minute. The best time to come here is during sunset until late at night.

To book, click here.

6.Danube Valley

Danube Valley Vienna

One of the most picturesque areas in Central Europe, even the scenic drive to get to Danube Valley is something travelers look forward to.  Just a couple of hours outside of Vienna, Danube Valley is dotted with charming villages, vineyards, ancient castles, hills and forests, colorful towns and rolling hills.

It is also packed with hiking trails and tracks. Make sure you hike through the forests and make your way up the mountains for stunning views of the Danube and nearby areas.

A trip along the Danube river by boat, through the Danube Valley, gives you the chance to see some of the most beautiful scenery around Vienna. Upstream during the cruise, the Danube leads to the Wachau Valley or to Melk with its famous abbey.

To book, click here.

7.Graz

Graz, Austria

At present a lesser known destination for travelers who go on day trips from Vienna, Graz is a charming old town that’s best suited for those who enjoy a lot of walking or hiking. About two hours by train from Vienna, Graz is located in the region of Styria and is a picturesque town with traditional flair and hip restaurants, bars and shops. It is situated in an Austrian region that’s known for its beautiful forests, lakes and mountains, chilled-out wine tastings, hot spas, and Baroque-style architecture, which you can enjoy during a visit to Graz.

Whether you want to shop or just enjoy the scenic town center, the area around Herrengasse and Hauptplatz is a haven for stunning architecture. Make sure you visit the Kunsthaus, which regularly hosts modern art exhibitions. Also, a must see when you explore the center of Graz, you won’t miss the ones at Hauptplatz / corner Sporgasse.

For the active types who want to enjoy a panoramic view of Graz, you can walk up the Schlossberg from Sackstraße. Make your way up the mountain and explore the area around the famous clock tower, which is seen in most photos that feature Graz.

8.Slovenia

Lake Bled Slovenia

One of the emerging destinations for those either touring Europe or going on weekend trips, Slovenia is a haven for those who like romantic sceneries, charming landscapes, and sightseeing while making sure each stop is documented via photos and videos. If taking a day trip from Vienna, going to and from Slovenia is less than four hours by car or train. To maximize your day visit, most tours highlight two destinations — Bled and Ljubljana.

Bled is a quaint town surrounded by stunning natural landscapes, and historic landmarks, with a lake running through it. Lake Bled is a famous attraction in the region. Situated in the middle of the expanse of its emerald green waters is a small island with a bright white church perched on top. For the active outdoorsy types, a visit to nearby Triglav National Park is a must. It has trails and tracks perfect for hiking and trekking, and afterward, you can swim in the natural pools while enjoying scenic views of the town.

Ljubljana, meanwhile, is the capital city of Slovenia, full of history and culture. Exploring the Old Town is a must when in Ljubljana, a place that is nestled between Castle Hill and the Ljubljanica River. The Old Town is where you’ll find a variety of shops and pubs, as well as beautiful squares, the Robba fountain, and it is also connected to New Town via the Triple and Dragon Bridges.

Old Town is home to a variety of restaurants, and if you wish to sample local cuisine, try the Slovene-style horse burger paired with a glass of local wine.

To book, click here.

9.Prague, Czech Republic

Prague Castle

From the Austrian capital, it takes almost four hours to get to and from Prague, Czech Republic, but it remains a top place to visit among travelers who take day tours from Vienna. A city that’s a must for history buffs, those into architecture, and good beer – Prague has a beautifully preserved old town that is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is one of the largest cities in Central Europe and has a rich and diverse history. It is famous for it’s unique, medieval architecture, Old Town’s charming streets, and winding alleys.

When exploring Prague, some must visit include the iconic Astronomical Clock; Josefov, the historic Jewish Ghetto; and, Prague’s Dancing House. Make sure you also see the old churches, such as the Týn Church, St. Vitus Basilica, and St. George’s Basilica.

While in Prague, it is a must to visit Prague Castle, the Old Royal Palace; and explore Wenceslas Square in the New Town, Make time for a stroll across the famous Charles Bridge and try to see a performance at the National Theatre.

After all the walking and exploring, take a break by going into a pub (or hospoda) and indulge in the Czech Republic’s favorite pastime: drinking beer!

To book, click here.

10.Brno

Špilberk Brno

Brno is another city in the Czech Republic that is a must-see for anyone interested in history and culture, as told by its centuries-old structures. The historical center of Brno is crammed with sites to make the most of your day trip. A good way to start getting to know Brno is by climbing up Petrov Hill to the Cathedral of St. Peter and Paul. The twin neo-Gothic towers is seen in practically every part of Brno and have less ostentatious Baroque interiors compared to many churches of the era.

On another hill is the Špilberk Castle which was once the most feared prison in the land. At present, the castle houses the Brno Museum and an exhibition that documents its chilling history.

 If you’re into the strange and macabre, visit the Ossuary of St. James Church, which has walls and ceilings adorned with human bones. Next to the Catacombs of Paris, the Ossuary of St. James Church is Europe’s second-largest ossuary.

To book, click here.

11.Croatia

Zagreb Croatia City

A stay in Vienna offers travelers many options to venture out of the city and explore nearby towns and regions and even another country. One of the best day trips you could experience is when you go to Croatia from Vienna, where you get to enjoy the scenic journey as you cross the border.

The capital of Croatia is Zagreb, a unique town that has its main areas divided between an upper and lower part. When you arrive in Zagreb, you first see the Lower Town, and you are greeted by the beautiful Ledeni Park and Art Pavilion. This great yellow building represents the architectural style of most structures around the city. As you walk further, you will reach the center where you will see the Ban Jelačić Square, and eventually Upper Town.

Lower Town Zagreb is more sprawling than Upper Town its streets and buildings bigger and it’s also where the major museums and cultural attractions are, such as the Mimara Museum and the Modern Gallery.

Meanwhile, the streets in Upper Town are small and winding. Here is where you will find the Museum of Broken Relationships, a place dedicated to failed romantic relationships. Its exhibits include personal objects and mementos from former lovers, with brief descriptions. Another must-see is the St. Mark’s Church, which has a colorful tiled roof that looks incredible against the backdrop of the bright blue sky.

One of the coolest spots in Zagreb is Dolac Market, which is situated between the Upper and Lower Towns. It has both indoor and photonic outdoor stalls and a haven for those who want to sample local cuisine or buy delicacies to bring home.

To book, click here

12.Salzburg

Salzburg City Austria

Located in the heart of the Alps, in central Austria, Salzburg is more than just that city where ‘The Sound of Music’ was filmed. Only two and a half hours by train, Salzburg is bound to be an enchanting day trip from Vienna especially if you’re looking for a perfect blend of history and culture. Famous for its baroque architecture that can be seen throughout the old town, Salzburg survived World War II with very little damage, so most of these old, Baroque buildings remain in their original condition. In 1997, the city of Salzburg was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

A great place to begin exploring Salzburg is from the Residenzplatz, one of the city’s largest squares and home to the Residenzbrunnen, an impressive marble fountain by Italian sculptor Tommaso di Garone. Next, you should see the rest of the Old Town, with its beautiful Baroque architecture as seen in the Salzburg Cathedral and Hohensalzburg Castle where you can enjoy a picturesque view of the city. Another must visit is Mozart’s Birthplace, one of the world’s most popular museums; and the gorgeous Mirabell Palace and gardens, where the Von Trapp children from the 1965 film. famously frolicked.

The city also has a number of palaces, gardens, a zoo and you can even visit the Mozart family home. As touristy as it is, no trip to Salzburg is complete without a visit to the filming locations of the classic ‘The Sound of Music’, which takes you to certain parts of the charming old town, lush lands, and rolling hills, covering dozens of must-see attractions around this timeless city.

To book, click here


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15 Day Trips From Prague, Czech Republic

Prague, the capital of the Czech Republic, is an incredible city to explore. Situated in the heart of Eastern Europe, Prague provides the ideal base for travelers who want to cross borders and take a peek at Switzerland and even Austria.

Within a day trip from Prague, you can marvel at castles, walk around charming historic cities, and even spend a day in another country. Whether it’s by train, a touring bus, a rented car, and even on a bike – here’s fifteen of the best day trips from Prague for you to make the most out of your vacation.

15 Day Trips From Prague

1.Crystal Glassworks Tour and Karlstejn Castle

karlstejn castle Prague

Only a few hours away, one of the more fascinating day trips from Prague leads you to the Crystal Glassworks factory and the Karlstejn Castle.

Located in the quaint town of Nizbor, the Ruckl Crystal Factory is a must see whether you’re into crystals or not. Ruckl is where the most famous Czech cut glass (Czech crystal) are made, which are the kind often given as a gift during state visits.

Visitors to the factory are given a guided tour, where they get to watch both the glass blowing and glass cutting phases of the production. After the tour, guests can check out the factory shop, where the products are available to buy at a convenient price.

Meanwhile, the nearby Karlštejn castle is one of the best known Czech monuments, which is also the guardian of the Crown Jewels and the Imperial Insignia in the 14th century. It was built in 1348 by the king Charles IV, and was designed to guard the coronation jewels and relics of the kingdom and the whole empire.

The present look of the castle was attained after the renovation that took place from 1887 to 1899. Located in the village of Karlstejn, the castle stands proud and pretty, its beauty fit for fairytales. Despite its regality, Karlstejn Castle never served as a full-on royal residence.

Opening Hours

Period  Days   Hours

1.–6. 1. Mon-Sun 10.00–15.00

1.–31. 1.  closed

2.–28. 2. Fri–Sun  10.00–15.00

3.–31. 3. Tue-Sun  9.30–16.00

4.–30. 4. Tue-Sun  9.30–17.00

4.              Mon        9.30–17.00

5.–31. 5.  Tue-Sun 9.30–17.30

6.–30. 6. Tue-Sun 9.00–17.30

7.–31. 8.  Mon-Sun 9.00–18.00

9.–30. 9. Tue-Sun    9.30–17.30

10.–31. 10 Tue-Sun 9.30–16.30

10. Mon 9.30–16.30

11.–17. 11.Tue-Sun 10.00–15.00

11.–22. 12. Sat-Sun 10.00–15.00

12.–25. 12. closed

12.–12. 1. Tue-Sun  10.00–15.00

1.–29. 2. Fri–Sun  10.00–15.00

Admission Fee

  • Children 6 – 15 years 230 CZK (€8.92)
  • Student 15 – 26 year (ISIC) 230 CZK (€8.92)
  • Senior over 65 years 230 CZK
  • ITIC card holders 230 CZK
  • ZTP card holders over 18 years 230 CZK

 

To book, click here.

Contact information

Address: Karlštejn 172 267 18  Karlštejn (okres Beroun)

Phone:  00420 311 681 617

Email: karlstejn@npu.cz

2.Klínovec Ski Areal For Beginners

Klínovec Ski Areal

One of the more exciting day trips from Prague is to experience skiing at the Klínovec, in the Krušné Mountains, considered as the area’s best skiing center. Take the beginner’s lessons for an easier, fun and hassle-free adventure. Apart from the thrill, you also get to enjoy stunning views of Bohemia on your way to Klínovec.

Only two hours from Prague, traveling to Klínovec takes you on a scenic route through central and western Bohemia to the Krušné Mountains and the ski area. Once there, you get to enjoy the day on easy slopes surrounded by stunning views of the mountains and the Czech countryside. It is one adventure you should consider if you have a spare day or two during your visit to Prague and want to try something new.

Opening Hours

Day skiing

Cashdesks 1–4 – 8:30 – 16:00

Lifts-9:00 – 16:00

Day skiing -1-3

Cashdesks 1–4- 8:00 – 16:00

Lifts-8:30 – 16:00

Night skiing

Pokladna č. 1b- 16:00 – 21:00

Vlek F- 16:00 – 21:00

Admission Fee

Single Ride

Prima Express chairlift single one-way ticket

Adult 170 CZK(€6.59)

Children100 CZK (€4)

Senior, Disabled, Junior 150 CZK (€6)

Prima Express single return ticket

Adult 250 CZK(€10)

Children 140 CZK (€5.43)

Senior, Disabled, Junior 220 CZK(€9)

Single Day, Multi-Day Ticket

1 day

Adult 590 CZK(€23)

Children 310 CZK (€12)

Senior, Disabled, Junior -510 CZK (€20)

2 days

Adult 1 050 CZK(€41)

Children 520 CZK(€20)

Senior, Disabled, Junior 900 CZK (€35)

3 days

Adult 1 450 CZK (€56)

Children 720 CZK (€28)

Senior, Disabled, Junior 1 250 CZK (€48.44)

Season

Adult 6 500 CZK (€252)

Children 3 300 CZK (€ 128)

To book, click here.

Contact information

Address: Loučná pod Klínovcem 322 431 91 Vejprty

Phone:  +420 415 240 240

Email: info@klinovec.cz

3.Teplice, the Royal Spa City

Teplice the Royal Spa City

Czech Republic’s countryside is a haven of their spa culture and a visit to Teplice is one the best day tours from Prague that you should experience. Situated in the foothills of the Ore Mountains 90 kilometers from Prague, the spa town of Teplice is the oldest spa in the Czech Republic and one of the oldest spas in Europe.

Also known as the “little Paris” of Bohemia, Teplice has ornate spa buildings, parks, gardens, fountains, a long pedestrian zone, and a Baroque Marian column. This is such a famous place even before that it was visited by tsars, kings, emperors and even great musicians like Beethoven.

The hot springs of Teplice are at  41 degrees Celsius, and the spring water here has been winding its way through the earth for 18,000 years. Teplice also has a Thermalium, which offers the largest thermal pools in the Czech Republic.

To book, click here.

4.Czech Vineyards and Wine Tasting Off-Road Tour

Modra Vineyard Czech Republic

Did you think the Czech Republic was a country of beer? Wait until you taste some of the local wines! One of the more satisfying Prague day tours, it doesn’t take too long to get to the Czech countryside. Comprising the eastern third of the Czech Republic and bordering on Austria, Slovakia, and Poland, the Moravia region contains 94% of the country’s vineyards. Abounding in wine cellars and hospitable accommodations, it is the perfect setting for the visitor seeking the best locations to know more about Czech wine.

While in Moravia, you get to explore vineyards and soak up some wine tradition and culture of the Czech Republic. Visit local wineries, learn about wine processing and growers’ work and life, then enjoy some wine tasting and savor the local cuisine. You can also discover a mysterious Jewish cemetery hidden in the middle of a vineyard,  a medieval castle standing just above another one, and walk around authentic Czech villages.

Aside from the wine, two historic towns in the region have much to offer in scenic and architectural beauty. There’s the  120-square-mile Lednice-Valtice Cultural Landscape, one of the largest artificial landscapes in Europe, which has been on the UNESCO World Heritage List as an “outstanding example of human creativity.”

Valtice and Lednice Chateaux and the surrounding parklands were transformed by the Dukes of Liechtenstein between the 17th and 20th centuries, making them an impressive combination of Baroque architecture and romantic English landscaping.

To book, click here.

5.Beer & Food Tasting in Rural Breweries

Grreat Synagogue Czech

One of the more eclectic places you could experience outside of Prague, a visit to the town of Pilsen isn’t just about beer and breweries. Much like other day trips from Prague, the old town of Pilsen is the ideal place to burn some calories walking.

Start your exploration of Old Town Pilsen at the Republic Square, where you can find the St. Bartholomew’s l, a Gothic masterpiece that has the tallest church tower in the Czech Republic. Walk up to the top of the bell tower for tremendous views over Pilsen and on a clear day, you can see as far as the Sumava Mountains. Right next to St. Bartholomew’s Cathedral, you will find  Pilsen’s Great Synagogue. This Moorish Revival style building is the second largest synagogue on the continent and third largest in the world.

A visit to Pilsen’s two major breweries is a must after spending hours walking around the town center. Have a pint or two of fresh beer, straight out of the barrel when you visit Pilsner Urquell and Gambrinus, breweries. These breweries have been around since the late 1800s, and a visit would give you not just a relaxing drink but a look into its history as well.

To book, click here.

6.Brno

brno czech republic

Brno is another city in the Czech Republic that is a must-see for anyone interested in history and culture, as told by its centuries-old structures. About three hours by train from Prague, the historical center of Brno is crammed with sites to make the most of your day trip. A good way to start getting to know Brno is by climbing up Petrov Hill to the Cathedral of St. Peter and Paul. The twin neo-Gothic towers is seen in practically every part of Brno and have less ostentatious Baroque interiors compared to many churches of the era.

On another hill, and just a 20-minute walk opposite the cathedral is the Špilberk Castle. It was once the most feared prison in the land, but Špilberk Castle managed to turn its harsh reputation and became one of the top attractions in Brno. At present, the castle houses the Brno Museum and an exhibition that documents its chilling history.

The town center of Brno is made up of a maze of alleys and winding roads, best for wandering around without a plan to discover the diverse architectural palette of Brno. If you’re into the strange and macabre, visit the Ossuary of St. James Church. Like Sedlec Ossuary in Kutna Hora, the Brno Ossuary features walls and ceilings adorned with human bones. Next to the Catacombs of Paris, the Ossuary of St. James Church is Europe’s second-largest ossuary.

To book, click here

7.Dresden

Zwinger Palace Dresden Czech

Proudly standing as the capital of the Free State of Saxony, and graced by the presence of River Elbe, Dresden is an underrated baroque paradise that seems to have been taken straight out of picture books. This city was devastated by the second world war in 1945 but has managed to rise from the ruins in a slow but steady process that is still taking place.

A day tour in Dresden promises not just a glimpse into its history but architectural marvels and a  taste of its culture as well. Start with a visit to the Frauenkirche, a Protestant church built in the 18th century, that was destroyed during the 1945 bombings. It was left in ruins for many years until it was successfully restored to its former glory and is once again serving as the city’s most recognizable landmark since 2005. Another must-see is the Procession of Princes, a mural made up of 24.000 tiles located right in the city center. Depicting the history of Saxony rulers, it is also the biggest porcelain artwork in the world.

After walking through the entire mural, you will reach Dresden’s waterfront,  — the Bruhl Terrace. It ia also known as the balcony of Europe and offers the best views of River Elba and Old Town. From there you can visit more of Dresden’s architectural and historic treasures, places that were destroyed by the second world war that was rebuilt and restored. It is difficult to miss the Hofkirche or the Dresden Cathedral, that stand side by side with the equally stunning Dresden Royal Palace. There’s also the Zwinger, a rococo palace with pretty courtyard gardens and the Semperhoper (Opera House) which is both an institution and city icon.

Finally, a day trip to Dresden won’t be complete without dropping by the Altmafkt, considered as the best Christmas market in Europe. Also known as the heart of Dresden, it has historically been the place of mass gatherings and markets, with its architecture mirroring the city’s history in the past century.

To Book, click here

Opening Hours

Zwinger Palace

Monday- Sunday – 6 am – 10:30 pm

Contact information

Phone:  0351 438370312

Email:  zwinger@schloesserland-sachsen.de 

8.Kutná Hora

Kutná Hora Czech

If you’re fascinated with all things Gothic and the macabre, then a visit to Kutna Hora is something you will enjoy. One of the quirkiest day trips from Prague, and much like the Czech capital, the town of Kutna Hora is rich in history and culture as depicted in its architecture.

Bestowed with a Heritage Site status by the UNESCO, Kutna Hora is one if those places that are best explored by walking.

Start your day in Kutna Hora by visiting two of its main attractions — the Sedlec Ossuary and the Cathedral of St. Barbara. Also known as the Chapel of Bones, the Sedlec Ossuary houses the skeletal remains of 40,000 to 70,000 people, that are used as ornate decoration within the chapel. The most impressive décor is the centerpiece, a giant bone chandelier containing nearly every bone in the human body. The Sedlec Ossuary js just a fifteen-minute walk from the train station, and one of the oddest chapels jn the world.

Only thirty-five minutes away by foot or ten minutes by bus is the Cathedral of St. Barbara. Bearing a striking resemblance to the St. Vitus Cathedral in Prague, St. Barbara’s principal architect was the son of the man behind the grand cathedral from the capital city. The approach to the Cathedral of St. Barbara is one of the town’s most famous scenes, as Gothic spires and thirteen stone statues greet you, fused with the backdrop of the Czech countryside.

A tour of these two might take your time but when in Kutna Hora, make sure to visit Hrádek Castle and Sankturin House, too.

To book, click here

9.Karlovy Vary

Karlovy Vary Czech

Karlovy Vary, a popular spa town that lies 126 km from Prague city center is quintessentially Czech, as its graceful 14th to 19th-century architecture attracted aristocrats and the well-to-do for hundreds of years. Karlovy Vary is a favorite not just among tourists, but also as the go-to European scene for filmmakers, gracing the silver screen in movies such as Casino Royale.

Karlovy Vary may be known as a spa town, but it also one of the more popular day tours from Prague, with its buildings that date back to the 14th-Century  There’s a wealth of Bohemian history and culture that can be discovered in these centuries-old structures, starting with Saint Peter and Paul Cathedral.

There are also a number of natural spas to explore here, as Karlovy Vary is home to the greatest number of hot springs in the world. If you’re not up to putting on a swimwear, you can still enjoy the city’s spa culture by walking among the colonnades between sips of cool mineral water. For those who need extra pampering, you can book yourself in for a full spa treatment.

To book, click here

10.Nuremberg

Nuremberg Castle Prague

Small enough to walk pretty much everywhere, Nuremberg is the perfect city for a day trip. It is a place filled with history and culture, there is so much to do and see to easily make the most of your visit. This city is perfect whether you’re interested in learning more about its history in museums, walking the streets to get a feel of what it used to be like or even do that all while snacking on traditional Bavarian food.

A sightseeing walk through the old town is an ideal way to start your Nuremberg day tour. Have a cup of coffee in one of the prettiest squares in Nuremberg, the Trödelmarkt. From there, you can walk across the Henkersteg and to the Kettensteg Bridge where you will find some of the most photogenic spots in the city.

Continue your old town Nuremberg tour with a visit to the nearby Weißgerbergasse (Tanner’s road), the most beautiful road in town with lots of original or restored half-timber houses. From there it is only a short walk up to the Imperial Castle, which has been around for about 1000 years and was used to be one of the residences of the Holy Roman Emperors. Another must-see is the Hauptmarkt (Main market), a huge market square in the center that hosts a farmer’s market and in December the world famous Christkindles Markt. You can also find the Frauenkirche (Church of our Lady) there.

Located in the middle of the Bavarian region, Nuremberg is a great place to get traditional food and drink (beer). The food is hearty and filling, and make sure you get a taste of their Nürnberger Bratwürstchen. You can get them at almost every street corner, served in a bun with or without Sauerkraut.  There’s also the Nuremberg gingerbread, or lebkuchen in German, considered a “Christmassy” treat, but in Nuremberg, you can buy it year-round.  Lastly, there is the schäufele, or oven-baked pig’s shoulder mostly served with potato dumplings.

Nuremberg is about two or three hours by bus train and private car from Prague and one of the most exciting day trips you’ll ever experience so make sure you include it in your itinerary.

To book, click here

11.Bratislava

Bratislava Slovakia

Located along Danube River and surrounded by mountains where castles, old churches, and historic plazas are a common sight, a day trip to the Slovakian capital Bratislava is something you should experience. Bratislava is not only a stunning historic city but one filled with beautiful natural wonders as well. If you only have a day to spend, make sure you check out the Old Town, an 18th-century village filled with bars and cafes. It is a car-free zone, making it a great place for a leisurely stroll.

A visit to old towns won’t be complete without seeing the churches, and in Bratislava, you have the Church of St. Elisabeth or the “Blue Church”, and features an impressive Art Nouveau style design. There’s also the Clarissine Church, which showcases unique Gothic architecture, and St. Martin’s Cathedral, another Gothic-inspired church that’s considered the largest and the oldest church in Bratislava.

After you’ve said your prayers, look out for Bratislava’s quirky inanimate ‘residents’, sculptures that were made to make the city a livelier place. There’s Čumil the Peeper, who seems to be coming out of a manhole; the Paparazzi by Radko Macuha, Schone Naci and Napoleon’s Solder, both created by Juraj Melis.

Once you’ve seen the statues, take a stroll around Bratislava Main Square, a public plaza surrounded by outdoor cafes and local shops. It is also where the Old Town Hall is located, right next to a clock tower and a Renaissance-style fountain.

When in Bratislava, it is a must to catch a glimpse of Michael’s Gate, the only remaining part of the medieval fortifications that once surrounded Bratislava and is now a famous tourist landmark. Another definite must do is to climb up the Bratislava Castle.

Located on a hill along the Danube River, the castle is a huge rectangular building with four corner towers. It also houses artistic and historical exhibitions of the Slovak National Museum and offers a  stunning view of the city and the nearby areas.

Slow down and relax after all the walking and climbing by trying some Slovak food like the Slovak potato salad and beef stroganoff, then see if you can get tickets to a show at the Slovak National Theater, or simply marvel at the building’s intricately designed interiors.

A strange, but interesting way to end your day in town is to head over to the UFO Observation Deck in central Bratislava. The viewing area shaped like a flying saucer is reachable by an elevator ride that will take less than a minute. The best time to come here is during sunset until late at night.

12.Bohemian and Saxon

saxon switzerland

If you’re into a more thrilling, active day excursion from Prague, you shouldn’t miss a visit to Bohemian and Saxon. That’s a full day of exploring the stunning natural wonders of the northern part of the Czech Republic and the Saxon-Bohemian Switzerland National Park, two destinations that showcase the beauty of the rugged central European mountains.

Bohemian Switzerland, actually, is not in Switzerland but a region in the north of the Czech Republic. This sprawling national park is just under two hours by bus, car, train or van from Prague, but it may as well be on a different planet. There is absolutely no trace of city life here. Instead, you will see verdant gulches, towering sandstone cliffs, peaceful farmlands, quaint little villages, and majestic rock formations. Bohemian Switzerland is a must visit for all outdoor enthusiasts.

Just next to Bohemian Switzerland, Saxon Switzerland National Park is situated across the German border. Here you can see the Bastei Bridge, a 194m tall bridge that spans the Elbe. It was built in 1851 and links several massive rock formations together. It is a bridge that was intended solely for people to bask in the beauty of the region. Another must-see here is the Neurathen, a medieval rock castle, carved into the steep sides of the Bastei.

To book, click here

13.Třebíč and Telč UNESCO

Třebíč Castle Czech

The Czech Republic has a total of twelve monuments that are UNESCO Heritage Sites, and two of those are found in the quaint little towns of Třebíč and Telč. Located in the eastern countryside in the Moravia, these towns can be reached within a few hours by bus, car or train, and among the more interesting and unique day tours from Prague.

The town of Třebíč dates back to the 11th and 12th century when the princes of Moravia founded a Benedictine monastery. Despite the Christian beginnings, Třebíč has become an important center of the Jewish culture in Moravia and the uniquely preserved Jewish ghetto is a testament to the coexistence of Jews and Christians.

It is the only Jewish monument in the UNESCO Heritage List, along with Jerusalem. Also from Třebíč, and especially from the observation tower Oslednice, you will see the town of Telč.

Enclosed with ponds and gates, the historical center of Telč has been quite known for centuries, since the times of Zachariáš of Hradec. It used to be a royal water fortress from the 13th century, founded on the intersection of trade routes, and its present appearance was due to the 16th-century reconstruction.

This renaissance castle complex was designed by B. Maggi from Arogno, along with the landscaped garden and park. The historical center of Telč was recognized as a UNESCO Heritage Site in 1992.

To book, click here

14.Český Krumlov and České Budějovice

Český_Krumlov Czech Republic

Only a couple of hours by bus, car or train, a visit to Český Krumlov and České Budějovice should be included in your itinerary if you wish to take a day trip from Prague.

A UNESCO World Heritage Site that could easily provide the setting for a fairytale, Český Krumlov is for those who are fans of beautifully designed structures. Situated in South Bohemia, Český Krumlov lies on either side of the Vltava River.  Its main attraction is the Český Krumlov Castle, which was built in the 13th-Century and features influences from Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque architecture. The gardens span an impressive 11-hectares and are immaculately kept. Another must visit especially for art lovers is the Egon Schiele Art Centrum which houses contemporary pieces of art in a historic building.

Right next to Český Krumlov is České Budějovice, the provincial capital of southern Bohemia and a natural base for exploring the region. The town is an excellent place to visit if you want to escape the large numbers of tourists in Prague or nearby Český Krumlov. There are many historic towns and villages nearby, like the picturesque village of Holašovice, which has a well-preserved folk Baroque center and is a UNESCO site.

České Budějovice may not have a lot of touristy sights, but it does have one of Europe’s largest main squares and a scenic maze of narrow lanes and winding alleyways, numerous hiking trails, and a vast cycle path network. It is also the home of ‘Budvar’ beer (Czech ‘Budweiser’), and a brewery tour is usually part of the ‘must-do’ list.

To book, click here

15.Vienna

Vienna Austria

It is only four hours by bus or a private car from Prague to reach this stunning Austrian capital that’s a must visit for culture and history enthusiasts. A UNESCO heritage city since 2001, Vienna in one of the best day tours you can experience. Start with breakfast in one of the many cafés all over the city, and soak up its coffee culture. Pair your Viennese coffee with apple strudel, sit for a while before heading out to the Schonbrunn Palace. This palace also opens earlier than other attractions, making it a good place to start to make the most of your Vienna day trip. Schonbrunn Palace is one of the most renowned cultural and historical monuments in Austria and is known for being the summer residence of the much loved Princess Sisi.

Stephansplatz, in the heart of the city and considered as Vienna’s most important square is a popular touristic area. This is where you can find the St. Stephen’s Cathedral, which is one of the country’s most iconic buildings. Next, there’s the Mozarthaus, which is just a few minutes’ walks from St. Stephen’s. This 17th-century building was Mozart’s home from 1785-1787 and is now a museum dedicated to the famous composer.

Lunch at Naschmarkt is a must, as there are dozens of food stalls here selling everything from fresh fruits and vegetables to trail mixes to sausages and olives. After eating, you may relax at the Art History Museum or Belvedere. both art museums set inside a palace.

Up next is the Hofburg Palace, once the main imperial palace in Vienna and the seat of power for the Habsburg family. Today, it is the workplace for the president of Austria and home to three museums: the Sisi Museum, Imperial Apartments, and Silver collection.

A visit to Vienna won’t be complete without marveling at the Bauhaus and its glorious Gothic details, then sampling a Wienerschnitzel for dinner, before seeing a show at the historical Vienna State Opera. Lastly, a visit to Vienna isn’t complete without another cup of Viennese coffee at the  Sacher Café paired with the delicious sacher torte.

To book, click here


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9 Best Day Trips From Zadar, Croatia

Zadar is a Croatian city located on the Dalmatian coast. Because of its strategic location, it is close to some of the best sites in the country and day trips from Zadar are possible.

The city is also the oldest inhabited city in Croatia and it’s home to Roman ruins, medieval churches, and a historic old town. But if these are not enough, here’s our list of most recommended day trips from Zadar, Croatia.

9 Best Day Trips From Zadar

1.Plitvice Lakes

plitvice lakes

Plitvice Lakes is considered to be one of the most beautiful national parks in the world and also dubbed as one of the places to see before you die by big travel magazines. Known for its beautiful 16 terrace lakes and numerous falls, this UNESCO heritage site should top your list of things to do in Croatia during summer.

The turquoise lakes are interconnected to each other and divided into 3 stations. Surrounding the area is a massive expanse of forested hills which creates a very scenic view. It’s one of the best day trips from Zagreb as it’s only 2 hours away from the city. Making it an ideal day trip if you want to get away from the city a bit. Or if you are on the way to the Dalmatian coast, is also an ideal stop before enjoying the Croatian beaches.

Admission Fee

Adults  60,00 (€8)

Adults –  groups 55,00 (€7.41)

Students*  50,00 (€7)

Students –  groups 45,00 ( €6)

Children 7 to 18 years 30,00 (€4)

Children 7 to 18 years –  groups 25,00 (€3.37)

Children up to 7 years and persons with disability (over 50%)**

How to get to Plitvice Lakes from Zadar

Take a bus from Zadar to Plitvice Lakes for 2 hours. There are several bus operators that go to Plitvice Lakes. The trip frequency differs from operator to operator with some only leaving wise and up to 4 times a day so make sure to plan accordingly.

The bus fare is between €6-15 for a one-way trip or €12-30 for a round-trip fare and the bus stops in front of the entrance of Plitvice.

To book, click here.

Opening Hours

Winter: wintertime calculation (from last Sunday in October) – summertime calculation (until last Saturday in March)
8.00 – 16.00 h (entering park/ticket purchase / exchanging vouchers for tickets – until 14.00 h)

Spring: summertime calculation (from last Sunday in March) – 31.05.
8.00 – 19.00 h (entering park/ticket purchase / exchanging vouchers for tickets – until 17.00 h)

Summer: 01.06. – 20.08.
7.00 – 20.00 h (entering park/ticket purchase / exchanging vouchers for tickets – until 18.00 h)

Autumn:

21.08. – 30.09.: 7.00 – 19.00 h (entering park/ticket purchase / exchanging vouchers for tickets – until 17.00 h)

01.10. – winter time calculation (until last Saturday in October): 8.00 – 18.00 h (entering park/ticket purchase / exchanging vouchers for tickets – until 16.00 h)

Contact Information

Address: Josipa Jovića 19  53231 Plitvice Lakes  Croatia

Phone: 385 (0) 53 751 014 

Email: info@np-plitvicka-jezera.hr

2.Krka National Park

Krka National Park Croatia

Krka National Park is the 7th national park in Croatia and it was established in 1985 to help preserve and protect the Krka river. The national park is massive and it extends from Adriatic to the mountains of central Croatia. It is probably most known for its majestic waterfalls flowing to Krka river pools, creating amazing cascades similar to Plitvice lakes.

Aside from the waterfalls, there are also several things to see in Krka. This includes Visovac island with its famous monastery, the gorges and the amazing vegetation in the area.

Admission Fee:

Jan-Feb-,Nov- Dec

(All accessible land sites)

Adults – 30.00 kn- (€4)

Children 7-18 – 20.00 kn (€3)

Children up to 7 years of age- Free

April, May, October

(All accessible land sites)

Adults – 100.00 kn- (€14)

Children 7-18 – 80.00 kn (€11)

Children up to 7 years of age- Free

June- August

(All accessible land sites)

Adults – 200.00 kn (€27) after 4 pm 150.00 kn (€20)

Children 7-18 – 120.00 kn (€16)  after 4 pm 90.00 kn (€12)

Children up to 7 years of age- Free

How to get to Krka National Park from Zadar

Take a bus from Zadar to Krka National Park. From Zadar Zob, take a bus to Skradin Busbahnhof. Please note that there are only 3 trips a day so make sure to plan accordingly. The bus schedule is as follows: 11:20 am, 2 pm and 9:55 pm. The bus fare is between €4-7 for a one-way trip or €8-14 for a round trip and the bus ride is about 45 minutes.

From Skradin Busbahnhof, you can take a taxi to Krka National Park for half an hour for €24-29 for one-way trip or €48-58 for a round trip. Do not walk as it is about 29 km away still.

To book,click here.

 

Opening Hours

January-February – 9 am- 4pm

March- 9 am- 5pm

April -8 am- 6pm

May & Sept 8 am- 7pm

June-August- 8 am- 8pm

Oct 1-15- 8 am-6pm

Oct-16-31- 9 am -5pm

November- December 9 am-4pm

Contact Information

Address: Trg Ivana Pavla II br.5, 22000 Šibenik, Croatia

Phone: info@npk.hr

Email: +385 (22) 201 777

3.Zagreb

Zagreb Croatia City

Zagreb is the capital city of Croatia and it’s one of the underrated cities in Europe. It has a rich history dating back from Roman times. Personally, it’s one of my favorite cities in the world. It’s laid back for a city and it has charming markets, amazing architecture, and awesome food.

How to get to Zagreb from Zadar

Take a bus from Zadar to Zagreb for 3 hours and 30 minutes. There are several bus operators that goes to Zagreb. The trip frequency differs from operator to operator with some only leaving once, twice and up to 5 times a day so plan accordingly.

The bus fare is between €12-40 for one-way trip or €24-80 for a round-trip fare depending on the operator.

4.Rastoke

Slunj, Rastoke, Croatia

Rastoke is the historic center of the Croatian town, Slunj. This beautiful village is known for its scenic location that’s straight from a postcard. The Slunjčica river flows to the local homes down to the river of Korana. This creates an amazing autochthonous ecologic and ethnographic significance because of natural harmony between nature and modern civilization.

The village is also likened to Plitvice because of the same way the river flows are layered and it’s often called the “little Plitvice”. The only difference is that instead of natural rocks and plants that create a branching on the rivers, it is the houses.

How to get to Rastoke from Zadar

Take a bus from Zadar to Slunj. There are several bus operators that goes to Slunj. The trip frequency differs from operator to operator but most of them leave once or twice a day so plan accordingly. The trip lasts for 3 hours and the bus fare is between €7-17 for one-way trip or €14-34 for a round-trip fare. Then walk to Rastoke for about 11 minutes. The village is still almost 1 km from Slunj.

To book, click here.

 

5.Kaštel Žegarski

 

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If you want some outdoor adventure, then head to Kaštel Žegarski – one of the least populous villages in Croatia. This village is close enough for a good day trip from Zadar. Aside from its laid-back village, it is also famous for its nature and it’s a popular canoeing and rafting area.

How to get to Kaštel Žegarski from Zadar

Take a bus from Zadar to Kaštel Žegarski. The trip frequency is only twice a day so plan accordingly. The trip lasts for an hour. You can check for the price and schedule here.

To book, click here.

 

6. Telaščica Nature Park

Telascica Cliff Croatia

One of the most incredible nature parks in Croatia, Telaščica Nature Park boasts of amazing wildlife, deserted islands, gorgeous cliffs, and azure blue waters. The nature park includes 13 small islands and it’s located off the coast of Adriatic.

Admission Fee

Individual tickets – daily per person

For visitors through mainland entrance Dolac 40,00 HRK ( €5.39)

For visitors through mainland entrance Dolac with discount 20,00 HRK ( € 2.69)

For visitors in vacation facilities of Nature Park “Telašćica” 10,00 HRK (€1.35)

For visitors in a vessel without an engine up to 6 m (Kanu, kayak, sailboat, paddle boat, etc.) 20,00 HRK (€2.69)

How to get to Telaščica natural park from Zadar

Take a ferry from Zadar to Telaščica natural park. The trip takes almost 50 minutes and there’s a ferry 4 times a day: 5:45 am, 10:30 am, 3 pm, and 8 pm. The fare is €5-6 for one-way trip or €10-12 for a round-trip fare.

To book, click here

 

Contact Information

Address: Sali X 1, HR-23281 Sali 

Phone: +385 23 377 096

Email: telascica@telascica.hr

7. Mostar

Mostar Old Town

Mostar is a city in the neighboring country of Bosnia and Herzegovina. It is known for Stari Most (old bridge) – a medieval bridge and the most popular tourist destinations in the country. Start Most is also the perfect example of Islamic architecture in the Balkans.

Before the war in Crimea in 2014, Mostar was the city where the last war in Europe happened in 1995. So if you want to learn about this historic city, then include a Mostar day trip from Zadar on your itinerary.

How to get to Mostar from Zadar

Take a bus from Zadar to Mostar. There’s only 1 bus operator that goes to Mostar and it leaves at 7:30 pm. The trip lasts for 4 hours and the bus fare is between €14-21 for one-way trip or €28-42 for a round-trip fare.

To book, click here

 

8.Split

Split Croatia

How to get to Split from Zadar

Take a bus from Zadar to Split for 2 hours and 30 minutes. There are several bus operators that go to Split and the trip frequency differs from operator to operator. Buses leave from once a day to up to 4 times a day so plan accordingly.

The bus fare is between €5-17 for one-way trip or €10-34 for a round-trip fare depending on the operator.

To book, click here

 

9. Ugljan, Ošljak and Školjić Islands

Ošljak Island

These amazing islands near Zadar are where dreams are made of. If you want a relaxing trip and just enjoy the Croatian islands, then head to Ugljan, Ošljak and Školjić Islands.

Školjić or Galevac is closed enough to the mainland and this oasis is surrounded by pine forest and awesome beach. In the middle is a little monastery and church by St. Paul that made this island more interesting. The Ošljak is like its little brother although a bit farther from the mainland. But like Školjić island, it has an interesting church from the 6th century in the middle of it and the island is surrounded by pine and Cyprus trees. The island is also inhabited.

Ugljan is the largest among these 3 islands and is connected to the mainland of Preko by a bridge. There are over 6000 people living on the island and it’s known for its beautiful medieval houses and beaches as well.

How to get to the islands from Zadar

The only way to get to these islands is by private boat. So either you rent out a boat or you can take this tour for €45. It includes all 3 islands, your snorkeling equipment, and insurance.

To book, click here.


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10 Best Day Trips From Zagreb, Croatia

Zagreb’s location makes it one of the best cities in Europe to be in. The proximity of the city to the best spots in Croatia and the neighboring countries makes it an ideal base. So if you are looking for some things to do in and outside of this Croatian capital, here’s our list of the best day trips from Zagreb.

10 Best Day Trips From Zagreb, Croatia

1. Plitvice Lakes

plitvice lakes

Plitvice Lakes is considered to be one of the most beautiful national parks in the world and also dubbed as one of the places to see before you die by big travel magazines. Known for its beautiful 16 terrace lakes and numerous falls, this UNESCO heritage site should top your list of things to do in Croatia during summer.

The turquoise lakes are interconnected to each other and divided into 3 stations. Surrounding the area is a massive expanse of forested hills which creates a very scenic view. It’s one of the best day trips from Zagreb as it’s only 2 hours away from the city. Making it an ideal day trip if you want to get away from the city for a bit. Or if you are on the way to the Dalmatian coast, is also an ideal stop before enjoying the Croatian beaches.

Admission Fee

Adults  60,00 (€8)

Adults –  groups 55,00 (€7.41)

Students*  50,00 (€7)

Students –  groups 45,00 ( €6)

Children 7 to 18 years 30,00 (€4)

Children 7 to 18 years –  groups 25,00 (€3.37)

Children up to 7 years and persons with disability (over 50%)** gratis gratis gratis gratis gratis gratis

How to get to Plitvice Lakes from Zagreb

Take a bus from Zagreb main bus station to Plitvice Lakes for 2 hours. There are several bus operators that go to Plitvice Lakes. The trip frequency differs from operator to operator with some only leaving once, twice and up to 4 times a day so make sure to check the bus schedule.

The bus fare is between €11-16 for a one-way trip or €22-32 for a round-trip fare and the bus stops in front of the entrance of Plitvice.

To book, click here.

 

Plitvice Lakes Day Tours from Zagreb

Opening Hours

Winter: wintertime calculation (from last Sunday in October) – summertime calculation (until last Saturday in March)
8.00 – 16.00 h (entering park/ticket purchase / exchanging vouchers for tickets – until 14.00 h)

Spring: summertime calculation (from last Sunday in March) – 31.05.
8.00 – 19.00 h (entering park/ticket purchase / exchanging vouchers for tickets – until 17.00 h)

Summer : 01.06. – 20.08. 7.00 – 20.00 h (entering park/ticket purchase / exchanging vouchers for tickets – until 18.00 h)

Autumn:

21.08. – 30.09.: 7.00 – 19.00 h (entering park/ticket purchase / exchanging vouchers for tickets – until 17.00 h)

01.10. – winter time calculation (until last Saturday in October): 8.00 – 18.00 h (entering park/ticket purchase / exchanging vouchers for tickets – until 16.00 h)

Contact Information

Address: Josipa Jovića 19  53231 Plitvice Lakes  Croatia

Phone: 385 (0) 53 751 014 

Email: info@np-plitvicka-jezera.hr

2. Rastoke

Rastoke, Croatia

Rastoke is the historic center of the Croatian town, Slunj. This beautiful village is known for its scenic location that’s straight from a postcard. The Slunjčica river flows to the local homes down to the river of Korana. This creates an amazing autochthonous ecologic and ethnographic significance because of natural harmony between nature and modern civilization.

The village is also likened to Plitvice because of the same way the river flows are layered and it’s often called the “little Plitvice”. The only difference is that instead of natural rocks and plants that create a branching on the rivers, it is the houses.

How to get to Rastoke from Zagreb

Take a bus from Zagreb to Slunj for almost 2 hours. There are several bus operators that go to Slunj. The trip frequency differs from operator to operator with some only leaving once, twice and up to 4 times a day so make sure to check the bus schedule.

The bus fare is between €5-14 for one-way trip or €10-28 for a round-trip fare then walk to Rastoke for about 11 minutes. The village is still almost 1 km from Slunj.

Or you can also take these day tours to Rastoke.

Rastoke day tours from Zagreb

For just €57 – it includes Rastoke, Plitvice and Homeland War Museum. To book, click here.

Plitvice Lakes & Rastoke Village Full Day Trip From Zagreb

For €110 – it includes Rastoke and Plitvice full day tour. To book, click here.

Opening Hours

Monday – Sunday from 9:00h – 21:00h

Tuesday – Closed

Contact Information

Address: Rastoke 25 b 47240, Slunj

Phone: + 385 47 801 460

Email: info@slunj-rastoke.com

3. Pula

Pula Croatia

Pula is the largest city in Istria – the largest peninsula in Adriatic coast and a county that is split between Croatia, Slovenia, and Italy.

Because of its proximity to Italy, it is no surprise that the architecture is influenced by the Romans. Pula is also popular for its own version of the Colosseum – the Pula Arena which is said to be constructed between 27 BC to 68 AD.

A popular medieval city in Adriatic, a day trip from Zagreb to Pula is a must!

How to get to Pula from Zagreb

Take a bus from Zagreb to Pula for 4-5 hours depending on routes. There are several bus operators that go to Pula, Istria. The trip frequency differs from operator to operator with some only leaving once, twice and up to 5 times a day so make sure to check the bus schedule.

The bus fare is between €16-50 for one-way trip or €32-100 for a round-trip fare depending on the operator.

To book, click here.

Contact Information

Address: Carrara Street 3, 52100 Pula, Croatia

Phone:052/351-300

Email:info@ami-pula.hr  

4. Kumrovec

Kumrovec Village Croatia

Kumrovec is a charming small village in the northern part of Croatia. It is known as the birthplace of Josip Broz Tito – former president of Yugoslavia and a popular statesman and communist from 1943 to his death in 1980.

However, people also visit in Kumrovec for the Museum ”Staro Selo”. This popular museum is known for showcasing the preserved homes of Zagorje villages, their way of life and culture.  The museum also offers a number of other interactive features for visitors – events and workshops, run by ethnologists experts in cooperation with the artisans of traditional crafts, tailored for different ages.

Admission Fee:

children, students, and pensioners – 15.00 kuna (€2)
(groups of over 30 are entitled to a discount price of 12.00 kuna per person) (€2)

adults – 25.00 kuna (€3.37)
(groups of over 30 are entitled to a discount price of 20.00 kuna per person)

family ticket – 55.00 kuna(€7.40)
(parents with underage children)

ticket for Vila Kumrovec – 10.00 kuna(€1.35)

How to get to Kumrovec from Zagreb

You can take a bus from Zagreb to Kumrovec but the trip frequency is only 4 times a week through Presecki Grupa bus line. The trip takes about an hour and a half for €5-6 for a one-way trip or €10-12 for a round-trip fare.

If you can’t work around this schedule, you can also take a train from Zagreb to Harmica for 45 minutes and the train leaves every half hour. It costs €3-6 for one-way trip or €6-12 for a round-trip fare. Then from Harmica, take a taxi to Kumrovec for an estimated fare of €40-50 for one-way trip or €80-100 for a round-trip fare.

To book, click here

Opening Hours

1 April through 30 September

Monday-Sunday: 9:00 – 19:00 (last entry into the Museum – 18:30)

1 November-last day of February

Monday-Sunday: 9:00 – 16:00 (last entry into the Museum – 15:30)

March and October

Monday-Sunday: 9:00 – 17:00 (last entry into the Museum – 16:30)

Contact Information

Address:  Josipa Broza 19 49295 Kumrovec 

Phone:  +385 (0)49 225 830

Email: mss@mhz.hr

5. Varaždin

Varaždin Croatia

Known for its baroque buildings, Varaždin is considered the “little Vienna” of Croatia. This town is located at about 81 km from Zagreb and it’s one of the most convenient day trips from the city.

Varaždin is also the tourist, cultural, educational and economic capital of northern Croatia. It is popular for its festivals, arts, and the popular baroque castle – the Varaždin Castle.

How to get to Varaždin from Zagreb

Take a bus from Zagreb to Varaždin for 1.5 hours. There are several bus operators that goes to Varaždin. The trip frequency differs from operator to operator with some only leaving once, twice and up to 5 times a day so make sure to check the bus schedule.

The bus fare is between €5-14 for one-way trip or €10-28 for a round-trip fare then walk to Rastoke for about 11 minutes. The village is still almost 1 km from Slunj.

To book, click here.

6. Ljubljana

Ljubljana, Slovenia

Ljubljana is the capital city of Slovenia. At only 2.5 hours away, this is one of the best day trips from Zagreb.

The city is considered one of the underrated cities in Europe not having the glitz and glamour of Paris or the historical buildings of Rome. But it is charming on its own. The city is colorful, lively and quaint at the same time. So if you like a relaxing trip to Europe, then this day tour of Ljubljana is a must.

How to get to Ljubljana from Zagreb

Take a bus from Zagreb to Ljubljana for 2 hours and 30 minutes. There are several bus operators that go to Ljubljana. The trip frequency differs from operator to operator with some only leaving once, twice and up to 5 times a day but Flixbus has one that is every 2 hours.

The bus fare is between €6-16 for one-way trip or €12-32 for a round-trip fare.

To book, click here.

 

7. Lake Bled

Lake Bled Slovenia

A postcard-perfect picture, Lake Bled is one of the most visited sites in Slovenia. The lake can be found in the Julian Alps of the Upper Carniolan region in Slovenia. Aside from its emerald green water, the lake is famous for its scenic setting where it is surrounded by mountains and forest and the Church of the Assumption. This Baroque church was built in the 17th century and it stands proudly in the middle of the lake – creating a scene that’s straight from a Disney movie.

How to get to Lake Bled  from Zagreb

Take a bus from Zagreb to Lake Bled for 3 hours and 20 minutes. There is only one bus operator that goes to Lake Bled – Croatia bus and there’s only one trip a day so plan accordingly. The bus fare is between €9-14 for one-way trip or €18-28 for a round-trip fare.

You can also take the train from Zagreb Glavni Kolod to Lesce-Bled (Croatian Railways: #EC 212, #EN 414, #EN 498) and trains leave 5 times a day. And the trip lasts for a little over 3 hours and it costs between €13-18 for one-way trip or €26-36 for a round-trip fare. Then from Lesce station, take a bus to Bled. It’s only for 9 minutes for €1-2 for a one-way trip or €2-4 for a round-trip fare and there are buses every 30 minutes. Through this route, the total transport is €28-40.

To book, click here.

 

8. Zadar

Zadar Croatia

Zadar is a Croatian city located on the Dalmatian coast. Because of its strategic location, it is close to some of the best sites in the country.

The city is also the oldest inhabited city in Croatia and it’s home to Roman ruins, medieval churches, and a historic old town. It is also popular for its Sea Organ where when waves hit the organ located at the seafront, it creates harmonic sounds.

After World War II, Zadar was hit badly and an attempt to repair the damaged seafront of the city paved the way to a monotonous concrete wall. Nikola Basic created the sea organ to redesign the seafront of the city. Since 2005, the sea organ was opened to the public and became the top tourist destinations in Zadar.

How to get to Zadar from Zagreb

Take a bus from Zagreb to Zadar for 3 hours and 30 minutes. There are several bus operators that go to Zadar. The trip frequency differs from operator to operator with some only leaving once, twice and up to 5 times a day so plan accordingly.

The bus fare is between €12-40 for one-way trip or €24-80 for a round-trip fare depending on the operator.

To book, click here.

 

9. Postojna

Postojna Slovenia

Postojna is one of the most captivating caves in the world. Located in the neighboring country of Slovenia, Postojna has magnificent rock and cave formations that you can’t find anywhere else. It is said to be 3 million years old. The cave has underground rivers, giant towers of stalagmites and stalactites and amazing landscape of limestones everywhere.

Postojna is also famous for its unusual fauna especially the “baby dragons” or olm – the aquatic salamander with translucent skin and no eyes.

Admission Fee

Low season:

Adult- 25,80 €

Students (16 – 25 years)- 20,60 €

Children from 6 to 15 years- 15,50 €

Children up to 5 years -1,00 €

High season:

Adult- 27,90 €

Students (16 – 25 years)- 22,30 €

Children from 6 to 15 years-  16,70 €

Children up to 5 years -1,00 €

How to get to Postojna from Zagreb

The most convenient way to get from Zagreb to Postojna is by bus due to more options and trip frequency.

Take a bus from Zagreb to Ljubljana for 2 hours and 30 minutes. There are several bus operators that go to Ljubljana. The trip frequency differs from operator to operator with some only leaving once, twice and up to 5 times a day but Flixbus has one that is every 2 hours.  The bus fare is between €6-16 for one-way trip or €12-32 for a round-trip fare.

Then from Ljubljana, take a train to Postojna. This takes another 1 hour for €6-9 for one-way trip or €12-18 for a round-trip fare. There are trains every hour. You can also take a bus but buses only leave every 4 hours. So it’s not a practical option. From Postojna station, you can either walk to the cave for about 20 minutes or take another bus that goes straight to the entrance of the cave. However, the bus is only 3 times a day. So this might not be an ideal option.

To book, click here.

 

10. Veliki Tabor Castle

Veliki Tabor Castle is a castle museum in Zajorge region in Croatia side. The castle is located at the top of the mountain at 333 meters above sea level. This gives the castle an amazing view of Zajorge region extending to the Slovenian side.

The castle was built by a Hungarian noble family of Rattkay in the 15th century and they owned it until 1793. The castle is now owned by the state and it’s one of the top tourist destinations in this part of Croatia.

Aside from its secular architecture, Veliki Tabor also has some gothic influence with its central part looking like a pentagon castle. There are also four circle Renaissance towers connecting the central part of the castle. So if you want to witness the grandeur of this castle, this day trip from Zagreb is a must.

How to get to Veliki Tabor Castle from Zagreb

Take a bus (Presecki Grupa) from Zagreb to Veliki Tabor Castle for 1.5 hours.  The frequency of the trip is only 4 times a day so make sure to plan accordingly.

The bus fare is between €6-7 for one-way trip or €12-14 for a round-trip fare then walk to Veliki Tabor Castle for about 30 minutes. Or you can also take a taxi straight to the castle for €60-80 for a one-way trip or €120-160 for a round-trip fare.

To book, click here.

 

Opening Hours

January- March, November -December 9:30 am-3pm

April – 9:30 am- 4pm

May- June- 8:30-5pm

July-August- 8:30 am- 6pm

September – 8:30 am-5pm

October – 9am – 4pm

Contact Information

Address: Jamska cesta 30 6230 Postojna

Phone: +386 5 700 01 00 

Email: info@postojnska-jama.eu

 


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